Always consult the Owners Manuals first

Amplifier models list

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H amps.png

The Owner's Manual lists all amp models with short descriptions. This wiki page provides additional information, including suggestions for suitable cabs, the controls on the original amps and links to relevant threads on the discussion forums. For more detailed information about each amp model, read Yek's PDF Guide to the Fractal Audio Amplifier Models.

  • If the real amp has no master volume control: Master Volume in the model defaults to 10.
  • If the real amp has two gain controls: the closest one to the 1/4" input on the real amp is Input Drive in the model, the other one is Overdrive.
  • If the real amp only has a single Tone control: it's mapped to Treble or Presence/HiCut in the model, depending on the amp.
  • If the real amp has two inputs (f.e. Low and High): the model is based on the High input. Set Input Trim to 0.500 to get the equivalent of using the Low input.
  • The controls in the models match the tapers of the real amp within 10%, except for Master Volume, Presence/HiCut and Depth.

Other guides:

The pictures below do not necessarily reflect the actual modeled amp.

Below the amp models in the Axe-Fx III are listed, in the order they appear on the hardware.

Contents

1959SLP JUMP (based on Marshall Super Lead Plexi 1959, Vintage Series)

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  • Based on: Marshall Super Lead model 1959 reissue, the classic "Plexi" amp head that gave rise to “the stack”. Four inputs, EL34 tubes, 100 watts. Modeled channels: Normal, Treble (High) and jumpered inputs.
  • Suggested cabs: Marshall, G12M (greenbacks), G12H, G12L. Stock cab(s): 4x12 Basketweave, 4x12 1960, 4x12 Pre-Rola, 4x12 Brit, 4x12 TV.
  • Original controls: Volume Normal, Volume Treble, Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. (about the Plexi model in the Standard/Ultra): "One of the first mods people make to real 'Plexi' Marshalls is to "clip the bright cap". The bright cap varied over the years, supposedly depending on what was lying around in the shop. The model defaults to the bright cap in the circuit. If you turn off Bright you're effectively clipping the bright cap. The bright cap in Marshalls can be very bright and harsh. However, if you crank the Master you might find the extra brightness helps compensate for the power amp getting darker."
    2. (about fizz) "It's the way a Plexi is supposed to sound. That's due to the cathode follower. That raspiness helps it cut through in a mix. I own three of them and they are that fizzy." source
    3. "Don't be afraid to turn the bass all the way down or the treble all the way up. Just like with the actual amp. For example, on the normal channel of a Plexi most people turn the bass way down. Otherwise it's too flubby."
    4. "The old one (Plexi 100w model) has a 2.7K cathode resistor on the first stage, the new one (1959SLP) has an 820 ohm." source
    5. "I based the SLP on using it with G12H(55) speakers which have a resonance of 55 Hz. When mounted in a typical cab the resonance will be in the low 70s. There is no right or wrong. Whatever sounds best." source
    6. "My settings for a "typical" Plexi tone are Bass: 2, Mid: 8, Treble 7.5. Adjust Presence to taste." source
    7. "What you are hearing is output transformer high frequency resonance. Old Plexis didn't do this because they had good transformers. New transformers are crappy and resonate at the cutoff frequency because they are underdamped. This causes a raspy, fizzy texture to the distortion. The transformer resonance is adjustable but the parameter isn't exposed to the user. When you turn it up you get that same squishy rasp that you are hearing. For the Plexis I have the damping set to flat with no resonance because that's how our vintage Plexis measure. Our 50W is a little underdamped but people complain about raspy high frequencies so I erred on the safe side." source
  • Yek's write-up.

1959SLP NORMAL

See above.

1959SLP TREBLE

See above.

1987X JUMP (based on Marshall 1987X, Vintage Series)

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  • Based on: Marshall 1987X Vintage Series, reissue of the Marshall 50w JMP Lead 1987, more agressive than the '60s Plexis. Features what many consider to be an “essential” mod to the tonestack of this Plexi. Four inputs, 50 watts, EL34 tubes. Modeled channels: Normal, Treble and jumpered inputs.
  • Suggested cabs: Marshall, G12M (greenbacks), G12H, G12L. Stock cab(s): 4x12 Basketweave, 4x12 1960, 4x12 Pre-Rola, 4x12 Brit, 4x12 TV.
  • Original controls: Volume Normal, Volume Treble, Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence.
  • More info: see 1959 SLP and Plexi models.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The 1987x doesn't have the 0.68uF cap on the last triode. Gives it a smoother distortion." source
    2. "My settings for a "typical" Plexi tone are Bass: 2, Mid: 8, Treble 7.5. Adjust Presence to taste." source
  • Yek's write-up.

1987X NORMAL

See above.

1987X TREBLE

See above.

5153 100W BLUE (based on 100w EVH 5150-III)

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  • Based on: EVH 5150-III, made in collaboration with Fender, a holy grail of modern tone. The original EVH 5150 and 5150-II amps were made by Peavey and are now called Peavey 6505 and 6505+ (models: PVH 6160 Block and PVH 6160+). Single input, 6L6 tubes, 100 watts. Modeled channels: Green (clean), Blue (crunch) and Red (lead). Modeled channel of 50 watts amp: Blue.
  • Suggested cabs: 5150, G12H, G12EVH. Stock cabs: 4x12 5153.
  • Original controls: Gain, Low, Mid, High, Volume, Presence. Resonance control (only on 50w model).
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "IMO, it's a very good amp. The build-quality is great and the design is very good. It is similar to the previous versions but voiced a bit different. Personally, I think all of the 5150's have more gain stages than necessary which just makes for unnecessary failure points but the "OMG, this amp has sooo many toobz it must sound awesome" marketing makes it understandable. It's incredibly heavy though." source
    2. "A 5150 uses a fixed bias with no adjustment. Depending on the tubes used the bias can run from average to cold. The model uses average. Some people like a colder sound. If you prefer your amps biased cold, then reduce the bias parameter to taste." source
    3. "The 50W version has a different input network than the 100W version for that channel. The 50W version has about twice the gain as a result. Otherwise things are pretty similar. You can simulate this using the Input Trim knob." source
    4. "The red channels (of 50w and 100w models) are identical." source
  • Yek's write-up.

5153 100W GREEN

See above.

5153 100W RED

See above.

5153 50W BLUE (based on 50w EVH 5150-III)

See above.

59 BASSGUY (based on '59 Fender Tweed Bassman, 5F6-A)

Bassman.jpg

  • Based on: 1959 narrow panel Fender Tweed Bassman, a low-to-medium gain amp designed for bass but more widely adopted by guitarists. 5F6-A circuit, 50 watts, high and low inputs, 6L6 tubes, Normal and Bright channels.
  • Suggested cabs: Fender 4x10" (P10R, P10Q). Stock cab(s): 4x10 Bassguy.
  • Original controls: Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence, Volume Normal and Volume Bright.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "There is no "High" channel on a 59 Bassman. There is a Normal and Bright channel. The Bright channel model is selected by turning on the Bright switch. The models are based on the higher gain input (the "1" input). To simulate the lower gain input simply set Input Trim to 0.5." source
  • Yek's write-up.

5F1 TWEED (based on Fender Tweed Champ, 5F1)

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  • Based on Fender wide panel Tweed Champ. Originally marketed as a practice / student amp. Sounds small and boxy, becaude of its low output (5 watts) and small speaker. 5F1 circuit ('58-'64), Class-A, single-ended (single 6V6 tube), 5 watts, High and Low inputs.
  • Suggested cabs: 1x8". Stock cab(s): 1x8 Tweed, Champlier.
  • Original controls: Volume, no tone controls.
  • Yek's write-up.

5F1 TWEED EC (based on Fender EC Vibro-Champ)

EC-Vibro-Champ.jpg

  • Based on Fender's Vibro-Champ from the EC (Eric Clapton) series, which is based on the 5F1 Champ, see above.
  • Suggested cabs: 1x8". Stock cab(s): 1x8 Tweed, Champlier.
  • Original controls: Volume, no tone controls, tremolo.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The circuit is slightly different than the original 5F1. It has cathode bypass caps giving it more gain." source
  • Yek's write-up.

5F8 TWEED (based on '59 high powered Fender Tweed Twin, 5F8)

5f8-2.jpg

  • Based on: Keith Urban's '59 high powered Fender narrow panel Tweed Twin, aka Twin-Amp. 5F8 circuit, four 5881 tubes, 80 watts, Bright and Normal inputs. The amp is said to sound similar to a Bassman, sounding warmer and larger.
  • Suggested cabs: Fender 2x12". Originally Jensen P12Ns, but Keith Urban's cab has Two-Rock speakers. Stock cab(s): 2x12 Double Amp KSM313.
  • Original controls: Presence, Middle, Bass, Treble, Volume Bright input, Volume Normal input.
  • Yek's write-up.

65 BASSGUY BASS (based on '65 blackface Fender Bassman, AB165)

Ab165.png

  • Based on: Dweezil Zappa's 1965 blackface Fender Bassman with AB165 circuit (CBS-era). Modeled channels: Bass and Normal. High and low inputs, 6L6 tubes, 50 watts.
  • Suggested cabs: Fender 2x12.
  • Original controls: Volume Bass and Volume Normal, Bass, Treble, fixed Presence circuit (Presence should be at 10), Bright switch on Normal channel.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "Definitely not your father's Bassman. Has a pissed-off Marshall vibe to it."
    2. "The AB165 uses 7025 preamp tubes (which are relabeled 12AX7). The phase inverter, however, is a 12AT7. The secret to the AB165 is the summing stage. It uses a inverting summing amp to sum the Normal and Bass inputs. This stage clips, because of all the local negative feedback, quite hard."
    3. (Quantum 3) "It's Dweezil's Blankenship modified Bassman. Dweezil's Bassman has two channels like a regular Bassman. The Normal channel is "normal" and corresponds to the 65 Bassguy Nrml model. The Bass Instrument channel is modified and that's the basis for the new model (Dweezil's B-man). It has a boatload of gain and sounds more like a Plexi than a Fender." source
  • Yek's write-up.

65 BASSGUY NORMAL

See above.

6G12 CONCERT (based on '60 brownface Fender Concert, 6G12)

6G12.jpg

  • Based on: brownface '60 Fender Concert. 6G12 circuit with solid-state rectifier, 40 watts, 6L6 tubes, low and high inputs. Normal and Vibrato channels (model: Vibrato channel).
  • Suggested cabs: Fender 4x10" (P10R, P10Q, C10R, Oxford). Stock cab(s): 4x10 Bassguy, 4x10 Super Verb Mix.
  • Original controls: Volume, Bass, Treble, Presence (and Vibrato: not modeled).
  • Yek's write-up.

6G4 SUPER (based on '60 brownface Fender Super, 6G4)

6G4.jpg

  • Based on: brownface '60 Fender Super, 6G4 circuit, around 40 watts, 6L6 tubes, low and high inputs. Normal and Vibrato channels (model: Vibrato channel).
  • Suggested cabs: 2x10" (Jensen P10R, P10Q, Oxford 10K5) or 2x12". Stock cab(s): 2x12 Brown Super M160, 2x10 Super Tweed Mix.
  • Original controls: Volume, Bass, Treble, Presence (and Vibrato: not modeled).
  • Yek's write-up.

AC-20 12AX7 BASS (based on Morgan AC20 Deluxe)

Morgan.jpg

  • Based on: Morgan AC20 Deluxe. EL84 tubes, 20 watts, switchable EF86/12AX7 preamp tubes. Models: EF86 B(ass) and T(reble), 12AX7 B(ass) and T(reble).
  • Suggested cabs: Alnico Gold, G12H. Stock cab(s): AC-20.
  • Original controls: Volume, Cut (model: Hi-Cut), Bright switch, Brilliance switch (cuts bass), power scaling, EF86/12AX7 switch.
  • Try the EF86 model with single-coils and the 12AX7 model with humbuckers.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The AC-20 model is based on the amp with the power scaling at maximum power which effectively disables it (and sounds best IMO)." source
    2. "As with the real amp I dial in quite a bit of Hi-Cut." source
  • Yek's write-up.

AC-20 12AX7 TREBLE

See above.

AC-20 EF86 BASS

See above.

AC-20 EF86 TREBLE

See above.

ANGLE SEVERE 1 (based on Engl Savage 120)

Savage.png

  • Based on: Engl Savage 120, channel 2 in "Rough" mode. 6550 tubes, 80-120 watts. Models: Contour Off (model 1) and Contour On (model 2).
  • Suggested cabs: Engl, V30/V60. Stock cab(s): 4x12 German V30 (RW).
  • Original controls: Gain (input sensitivity), Lead (degree of distortion), Lead Boost switch, Contour switch, Bass/Middle/Treble, Rough/Smooth switch, Master, Presence, Depth Boost switch.
  • Rough overdrive mode: "emphasis on high and low ends, great for rhythm playing with a pronounced bottom end and gritty, biting highs. Use Bass (11:00-13:00) sparingly. Keep Depth Boost (80 Hz +6dB) off."
  • Contour:
    • OFF: boosts lower midrange around 500 Hz (warm tone).
    • ON: boosts from 1200 Hz and cuts lower midrange (more transparency).
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "From noon and up it's a presence boost, from noon down it's a presence cut." source
  • Yek's write-up.

ANGLE SEVERE 2

See above.

ATOMICA HIGH (based on Cameron Atomica)

Atomica.jpg

  • Based on: Cameron Atomica, a "brown sound" amp. EL34 tubes, 100 watts. Models Low gain and High gain inputs.
  • Suggested cabs: G12H.
  • Original controls: Thump (model: Depth), Presence, Bass, Middle, Treble, Master, Gain, Edge (model: Bright switch), 3-way gain voice switch.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The Atomica can tolerate high MV because it is a "Jose-style MV". The Jose-style MV imparts a very high source resistance to the tone stack which causes much more insertion loss and therefore lower drive level into the power amp."
    2. "In the design of some amps the lowcut frequency is dependent upon the Drive setting. In these cases the Lowcut parameter defaults to 10 Hz and the actual lowcut filtering is calculated as part of the Drive knob function." source
  • Yek's write-up.

ATOMICA LOW

See above.

BAND-COMMANDER (based on '68 silverface/blackface Fender Bandmaster, AB763)

Bandmaster.jpg

  • Based on: 1968 silverface Fender Bandmaster with the blackface AB763 circuit. High and low inputs, 6L6 tubes, around 40 watts. Normal and Vibrato channels (model: Vibrato channel).
  • Suggested cabs: Fender 2x12.
  • Original controls on Vibrato channel: Volume Bright and Volume Normal, Bright switch, Treble, Bass (and Tremolo controls: not modeled).
  • Yek's write-up.

BIG HAIR (custom model)

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  • Custom Fractal model, mids without mud. Revive the 80s metal scene (Spandex not included). It's similar to a modded Marshall JCM 800.
  • Suggested cabs: Marshall, G12M (greenbacks), G12H, G12L. Stock cab(s): 4x12 Basketweave, 4x12 1960, 4x12 Pre-Rola, 4x12 Brit, 4x12 TV.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "It was a total guess. I just tuned it by ear. It's just my idea of what 80's hair metal might sound like."
  • Yek's write-up.

BLANKNSHP LEEDS (based on Blankenship Leeds 21)

Blankenship.jpg

  • Based on: Dweezil Zappa's Blankenship Leeds 21, a boutique version of an 18 watts Marshall with a big sound at low power. Known for sounding “big” despite being relatively low power. 21 watts, EL84 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: 2x10, 1x12, 2x12.
  • Original controls: Volume, Tone (model: Treble) and Tremolo (not modeled).
  • Turn up Volume and Treble, and use the guitar's volume knob.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The model was matched to Dweezil's amp. He loaned it to me because it was one of his favorite amps and I can see why. It's a really cool amp." source
    2. "The amp has no hi-cut circuit therefore the control won't do anything. Neither will the Depth." source
    3. "18W Marshalls are kind of a bad design. The phase inverter drives the power tubes too hard whioch results in excessive bias excursion.” source
  • Yek's write-up.

BLUDOJAI CLEAN (based on Bludotone Ojai)

Ojai.png

  • Based on: AustinBuddy's Bludotone Ojai, an exact clone of Robben Ford's "Tan" Dumble. 100 watts, 6L6 tubes, Normal and FET inputs. Modeled: Clean preamp with Pre-Amp Bypass off (PAB), and OD with PAB on (LD PAB) and PAB off (LD).
  • Suggested cabs: G12-65, EVM. Stock cabs: 1x12 Bludo, 4x12 Rumble.
  • Original controls: Volume (model: Input Drive), Overdrive Level (model: Overdrive, OD channel only), Treble, Middle, Bass, Master, Presence. Switches: Bright, Mid, Rock/Jazz. Footswitchable Pre-Amp Bypass (PAB). PAB bypasses the tone stack and increases the gain.
  • Forum member AustinBuddy, owner of the original amp:
    • "The model is of a 100w 6L6 BludoDrive Ojai by Bludotone amps, using Fractal's MIMIC process. The Ojai has the same schematic as the famous "Tan" boutique amp played by Robben Ford. It pairs well with the factory Rumble 4X12 cabinet. On the Ojai there is a bright cap on the Master Volume. As you turn the MV down, it will get thinner. This makes the MV even more sensitive than usual since there’s another interaction going on. To get the most range out of this amp, experiment with Master Volume and listen how it interacts with low or high Drive settings, similar to the real amp. The breakup range/tones between is wide and dynamic and can respond to your playing dynamics, getting crunchier as you dig in and cleaner as you play lighter. The amp's Bass response should increase noticeably as you turn up the Master Volume from the default MV position. Pair it with a G12-65H speaker. Cab Pack 17 has many choices (full disclosure, I produced 5 of the 6 Cabs in that Cab Pack). The BludoMix Cab in factory firmware is a 1x12 Alnico dual port cab, and will sound good but perhaps a tad darker (great for Jazz) on clean sounds than the G12-65H will. Now, if you like, put a Zen drive in front on the BludoClean amp....or a boost...and listen to how that clean channel wakes up fast for grittier leads and touch-responsiveness. For BludoLead, take the Lead default amp values. Put the Master Volume on 5. Put drive at 4-5 and Overdrive at 4-5, and experiment with the tone stack swaps above. If you want the amp to feedback effortlessly on a note, raise the overdrive setting higher combined with the gain, provided you have sufficient volume coming out your speakers to hit your guitar pickups in a reinforcing loop, it will do it! Throw a boost or Zen drive on that, if you like..." source
  • Yek's write-up.

BLUDOJAI LEAD 1

See above.

BLUDOJAI LEAD 2

See above.

BOGFISH BROWN (based on Bogner Fish)

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  • Based on: Bogner Fish preamp, a blue 4-channel tube preamp. Modeled: Strato (tight high gain) and Brown (fat high gain) channels.
  • Suggested cabs: n/a.
  • Original controls (Strato and Brown): Master, Gain, Bass, Mid, Treble.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "I used the power amp models from the XTC." source
  • Yek's write-up.

BOGFISH STRATO

See above.

BOUTIQUE 1 (based on Matchless Chieftain)

Chieftain.jpg

  • Based on: Matchless Chieftain, a medium-gain amp, thick, yet crisp, with a fair amount of power amp breakup. The Boutique 2 model is modeled with a boost for more gain and high-frequency emphasis. 40 watts, EL34 tubes, 12AX7 and Ef86 preamp tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: Matchless (combo of G12M and G12H). Stock cab(s): 2x12 Boutique.
  • Original controls: Volume, Master, Bass, Treble, Brilliance (model: HiCut).
  • Yek's write-up.

BOUTIQUE 2

See above.

BRIT 800 (based on Marshall JCM 800 2204)

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  • Based on: Marshall JCM 800, the vaunted model 2204, 50 watts, EL34 tubes, Low and High inputs.
  • Suggested cabs: Marshall, G12M (greenbacks), G12H, G12L, G12-75, V30. Stock cab(s): 4x12 Basketweave, 4x12 1960, 4x12 Pre-Rola, 4x12 Brit, 4x12 TV.
  • Original controls: Pre-Amp, Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence, Master.
  • The BRIT AFS100 1 and BRIT 800 #4 models are based on the 100 watts JCM 800 2203.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "It is a very bright model. However, it sounds exactly like the amp it was based on. If it is too bright, you can adjust the various tone controls and parameters to reduce the brightness to your tastes. They are designed to be run loud and the brightness decreases as the MV is increased. The sound of 80's hair metal for sure." source
    2. "The saturation switch switches in a zener diode clipping stage right before the tone stack. This is the Arrendondo Mod."
    3. "Rips my head off here. I have to turn the presence way down. Check the MV. Too high and will get muddy." source
    4. "That "interference" is due to all the treble peaking used in the design. JCM800s have quite a bit of treble boost. When you first attack the string the note is unpitched. It's basically a brief explosion of noise. The treble boosting amplifies the upper frequencies of this noise burst which is what you hear. However, when you playing in a loud mix that treble boosting helps the sound cut. Modern designs use more carefully crafted treble boosting to retain the cut but tame some of the harshness of the attack. This is accomplished typically by putting a capacitor in parallel with the plate resistor(s) which rolls off around a few kHz. This preserves the treble boost in the upper midrange but softens the attack. I believe the SLO100 was one of the first amps to do this. You can see this in the Axe-Fx II as your Triode Freq parameters. You can soften the JCM800 attack by lowering the Triode Freq values. Most modern hi-gain designs use some form of HF rolloff like this. Another reason is that JCM800s use relatively low amounts of negative feedback (which is why they're so loud). This causes a treble boost in the power amp. Increase the Damping parameter to increase the negative feedback." source
    5. "Those amps are all designed to get their character from power amp distortion. If you don't push the power amp all you are hearing is the preamp which is voiced to be trebly. The power amp then compresses the highs and the sound gets fatter." source
    6. "It's a vertical input Canada export version. I went through several before settling on this one as it was the best sounding by far." source
    7. (about moving Master volume to the post phase inverter) "It's called PPI MV or the "Lar-Mar Mod"." source
    8. "At low MV the source resistance into the PI is low which raises the highpass frequency due to the coupling cap and raises the lowpass frequency due to the Miller capacitance and snubber. As you increase the MV the source resistance increases which decreases both of these things. As you keep raising the MV the source resistance then starts to decrease as you get above 50% of the pot value." source
    9. "Some of them are really dull. We have two 50 watters. One is a Canadian export with bat-handle switches and sounds glorious. All nasty and spitty and full of "artifacts". The other is a "regular" one with the rocker switches. It sounds like it has a blanket over it in comparison. Our model is based on the Canadian one. Oh, and I should add that someone removed the bright cap from the Canadian one. Probably because it's so nasty with it in. I installed a new one to bring it back to it's original glory. The key to JCM800's is to crank the MV to overcome the brightness of the preamp." source
    10. "Our reference amp had the bright cap removed by a previous owner. I put it back in. I like it on, even with a bright guitar." source
  • Yek's write-up.

BRIT 800 #34 (based on Marshall JCM 800 with #34 modifications)

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  • Based on: Marshall JCM 800, modded to sound like a rental Marshall Super Lead Plexi (no. #34), used by Slash when recording Appetite for destruction.
  • Suggested cabs: Marshall, G12M (greenbacks), G12H, G12L, G12-75, V30. Stock cab(s): 4x12 Basketweave, 4x12 1960, 4x12 Pre-Rola, 4x12 Brit, 4x12 TV.
  • Original controls: Pre-Amp, Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence, Master.
  • Notes: see Brit 800 model.
  • Marshall's AFS100's amplifier, in its #34 mode, was designed to achieve the same goal and has been modeled by Fractal Audio (Brit AFS100 1).
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The Brit 800 #34 does a better Slash than the AFS100 IMO. The AFS100 models are based on the actual amp but I think my version of #34 sounds more like AFD. I based the model on information I've collected over the years about the mods that were done."
    2. "The Brit 800 #34 has a ton of treble boost and will squeal with certain guitars and/or certain IRs and/or certain types of amplification. Nature of the beast. No other amp has anywhere near the amount of treble boost. The AFD100 amp that Marshall produced years later (that was supposed to be a #34 copy) has nowhere near the amount of treble boost and has a huge snubber cap on the PI (which rolls off the treble). My gut tells me that they did this because they feared there would be too many reports of pickup squeal (or the amps would be too unstable at high gain)." source
  • Yek's write-up.

BRIT 800 MOD (custom model, based on modded Marshall JCM 800)

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  • Based on: modded JCM 800 modded (removal of the treble peaker, more gain) to be "heavier" and "less strident".
  • Notes: see Brit 800.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "It's called PPI MV or the "Lar-Mar Mod"." (about moving Master Volume to post Phaser Inverter). source
  • Yek's write-up.

BRIT AFS100 1 (based on Marshall AFD100SCE)

AFD.jpg

  • Based on: Marshall AFD100 Special Collector's Edition dual-mode head. The AFD100 is a reissue of two Marshall amps used by Slash when recording GnR's Appetite for Destruction album. The Brit AFS100 1 model is based on the amp's #34 mode (LED off), the equivalent of a modded JCM 800 2203. The Brit AFS100 2 model is based on the AFD mode (LED on), which is a modded Super Lead Plexi (model 1959). 100 watts, 6550 tubes, low and high inputs.
  • Suggested cabs: V30.
  • Original controls: Gain, Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence, Master, #34/AFD switch.
  • The Brit Super model is based on a schematic of the AFD100 amp, rather than on the real amp.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. " I have an actual Slash signature model and spent a lot of time measuring, listening and comparing." source
    2. "The Brit 800 #34 does a better Slash than the AFS100 IMO. The AFS100 models are based on the actual amp but I think my version of #34 sounds more like AFD. I based the model on information I've collected over the years about the mods that were done." source
    3. "The Brit 800 #34 has a ton of treble boost and will squeal with certain guitars and/or certain IRs and/or certain types of amplification. Nature of the beast. No other amp has anywhere near the amount of treble boost. The AFD100 amp that Marshall produced years later (that was supposed to be a #34 copy) has nowhere near the amount of treble boost and has a huge snubber cap on the PI (which rolls off the treble). My gut tells me that they did this because they feared there would be too many reports of pickup squeal (or the amps would be too unstable at high gain)." source
  • Yek's write-up.

BRIT AFS100 2

See above.

BRIT BROWN (custom model)

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  • Custom Fractal model, a faithful recreation of the pure, raw "Brown Sound" - The modded “#1” Marshall.
  • Suggested cabs: G12M, G12H, G12-EVH, V30.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The Brit Brown was built by ear." source
    2. "Brit Brown is my personal take on what the ultimate "Brown" plexi should sound like. It's based on a 100W SLP with Arredondo mods and a few little voicing tweaks." source
  • Yek's write-up.

BRIT JM45 (based on Marshall JTM 45)

JTM.png

  • Based on: Marshall JTM 45, made famous by Clapton and others; actually a modified Bassman design. 30 watts, KT66 tubes, Normal and High Treble channels, two inputs per channel. Modeled: High Treble channel and jumpered inputs.
  • Suggested cabs: G12M, G12H, G12L, Marshall.
  • Original controls: Volume, Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "They had no Master Volumes so people rarely got the Drive past 3.00 since it would melt your face. Without the specter of having your skin flayed off as is afforded by a model of the amp, the temptation is to turn the Drive way up. When you do this the low notes get very muddy. Single notes can form an almost perfect square wave which will sound like a synthesizer." source
    2. "Our reference amp has a 100 pF bright cap. Many JTM45s did not but I think they sound better with one. A JTM45 with a bright cap is similar to a Superlead." source
    3. "If you want the Channel 1 sound with an Axe-Fx use the Brit JM45 Jump model and turn the Treble Drive knob all the way down." source
  • Yek's write-up.

BRIT JM45 JUMP

See above.

BRIT JVM OD1 GREEN (based on Marshall JVM410H)

Jvm.png

  • Based on the Marshall JVM 100 watts amp, a popular high gain 4 channel head (Clean, Crunch, OD1, OD2) with 3 modes per channel (Green/Orange/Red). EL34 tubes, single input. OD1 Gn: Green (hot-rodded JCM). OD1 Or: Orange (extra gain). OD1 Rd: Red (even more gain). OD2: more gain and lower mids than OD1 (centred around 500 Hz instead of the more typical Marshall value of 650 Hz).
  • Suggested cabs: combo of V30 and G12H, Marshall.
  • Original controls: Master, Bass, Middle, Treble, Gain, Presence, Resonance, Reverb.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "IMO, the reason the JVM sounds good is the plate cap on the second-to-last triode. That smooths out the tone considerably. The second-to-last triode is associated with "Triode 1 Freq" in the advanced parameters. You can adjust this to simulate adding a cap to the plate. The other thing that helps the tone is the 220K plate resistor on the last triode. This shifts the bias point down vs. a "classic" Marshall. Unfortunately the bias points aren't exposed to the user." source
  • Yek's write-up.

BRIT JVM OD1 ORANGE

See above.

BRIT JVM OD1 RED

See above.

BRIT JVM OD2 GREEN

See above.

BRIT JVM OD2 ORANGE

See above.

BRIT JVM OD2 RED

See above.

BRIT PRE (based on Marshall JMP-1)

Cliff JMP-1.jpg

  • Based on: Marshall JMP-1 preamp, a rack-mount preamplifier version of the Brit 900, with MIDI. For crunchy “ZZ” tones. EL34 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: n/a.
  • Original controls: Volume, Gain, Bass, Mid, Treble, Presence, Bass shift.
  • The preamp model includes a Marshall power amp model, based on a typical Marshall 100 watts power amp of that era.
  • Other models based on the Marshall JMP-1: JMPre-1.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The two channels have preset tone stacks. Then there is a digitally controlled 4-band graphic EQ which is the B/M/T and Presence. This technique gets around the problem of trying to digitally control a tone stack. The Triaxis uses LDRs in place of potentiometers. The Soldano X-99 uses motorized pots. Both techniques being expensive. So the JMP-1 uses a fixed tone stack and then a digitally controlled graphic EQ. The Axe-Fx model of the JMP-1 is "better" in the sense that the tone controls control the tone stack rather than a graphic EQ. You then have the separate graphic EQ to further tailor the sound. What I didn't do, and why people probably feel the model differs, is "normalize" the tone controls so that with B/M/T at noon the tone stacks match. On the Axe-Fx you might need to set the Bass to 3, Mid to 7, etc. to get the tone to match. I just used a standard Marshall tone stack whereas the JMP-1 uses a standard Marshall tone stack but the pots are replaced with fixed resistors but those values don't necessarily correspond to the pots at noon." source
    2. "The JMP-1 tone controls have more range than the actual preamp. The preamp has about +/- 8 dB for each tone control while the model has the standard +/- 12 dB."
  • Yek's write-up.

BRIT SILVER (based on Marshall Silver Jubilee)

Jubilee.png

  • Based on: Marshall Silver Jubilee, a distinctive commemorative 25th anniversary British amp model, slightly darker and higher gain than a JCM 800. EL34 tubes, single input, Clean and Lead channels. Makes use of LED (Light Emitting Diode) clipping.
  • Suggested cabs: V30, EVM, Marshall.
  • Original controls: Presence, Bass, Middle, Treble, Gain, Master.
  • Yek's write-up.

BRIT SUPER (based on Marshall AFD100)

AFD.jpg

  • See Brit AFD100 models. This model is based on a schematic of the Marshall AFD100. The Brit AFS100 models are based on the real AFD100 amp.

BUTTERY (based on Budda Twinmaster)

Budda.jpg

  • Based loosely on a late 90s specimen Budda Twinmaster (now: Peavey). Relies mostly on power amp distortion. 18 wats, EL84 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: Phat.
  • Original controls: Bass, Treble, Volume.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "I did the Buttery model by ear. I listened to some clips of Buddas (Matchbox 20... excellent!) and tweaked the model until I thought it sounded like one. Screwed around a little with the tube bias points until it had the right balance of harmonics and called it a day."
    2. "It's still the "ear tuned" version. I bought the amp but because it was so popular as-is I didn't dare change it." source
    3. "Buttery is a virtual amp model that was created by ear. There is no physical, real amp that exists upon which it was based. It's like the FAS models. They exist solely in the virtual world. They all still benefit from the Quantum stuff though as they use the same underlying algorithms for the tube modeling. The amp model, regardless of how accurate it is (and it's probably grossly inaccurate as I never compared it to any actual amp) is very popular and that's why it was never matched to any real amp." source
  • Yek's write-up.

CA3+ CLEAN (based on Custom Audio Amplifiers 3+ SE)

CAE.png

  • Based on: 3+ SE, a preamp designed by Custom Audio Amplifiers. Clean, rhythm and lead channels.
  • Suggested cabs: n/a.
  • Original controls: Gain, Bass, Middle, Treble, Master, Bright switch. Active tube EQ: Treble and Bass.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "An OD100 is the head version of a CAE 3+." source
    2. "That's a "James" tone-stack. You can find simulations on-line but typically you would get close using shelving filters with frequencies of 100 and 1000 Hz." source
  • Yek's write-up.

CA3+ LEAD

See above.

CA3+ RHYTHM

See above.

CALI LEGGY (based on Carvin Legacy VL100)

Legacy.jpg

  • Based on: Carvin Legacy VL100 amplifier. 100 watts, EL34 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: Carvin, V30. Stock cab(s): SV Legend.
  • Original controls on Lead channel: Presence, Treble (11kHz), Mid (650Hz), Bass (80Hz), Drive, Volume.
  • The Legato 100 is another model based on the Carvin Legacy VL100.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The thing that makes a Legacy unique is the tone stack. It uses a "James" tone stack which is more like hi-fi tone controls." source
  • Yek's write-up.

CAMERON CCV 1A (based on Cameron CCV-100)

Ccv.jpg

  • Based on: Cameron CCV-100, an amp its creator Mark Cameron calls “one pissed off amp". 100 watts, EL34 tubes.
  • Models:
    1. 2A: Bright1 switch left, Bright2 switch left, Gain Style switch left.
    2. 2B: Bright1 switch left, Bright2 switch right, Gain Style switch left.
    3. 2C: Bright1 switch left, Bright2 switch left, Gain Style switch right.
    4. 2D: Bright1 switch left, Bright2 switch right, Gain Style switch right.
  • The Bright switch selects the Bright capacitor which you can alter via the Advanced menu.
  • Suggested cabs: G12H.
  • Original controls:
    • Channel 1: Punch (= Resonance / Depth), Presence, Master, Bass, Middle, Treble and Gain, 3-way Voicing switch (resonance), 3-way Dark switch (presence), 3-way Gain Style switch (“Jose Master” gain/clipping), 3-way Bright switch (less noticeable at higher gain settings).
    • Channel 2: Solo Master, Master, Bass, Middle, Treble, two Gain controls (model: Input Drive and Overdrive), 3-way Gain Style switch, two Bright switches, Drive switch.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The amp was modeled with the Voicing switch in the middle position. The "Dark" switch is the Negative feedback control. Set Negative Feedback to 3.6 to reproduce the switch in the middle position. Set it to 9.8 to reproduce the switch in the right position. 5.0 for left position (default). The amp has a dozen switches and, frankly, there isn't a lot of difference between some of the settings. The Drive switch sounds virtually identical whether left or right. I don't like it in the middle." source
    2. (about the Drive knob) "Our reference amp has a linear taper pot so the behavior is very abrupt. The model matches the amp extremely accurately (as do all G3 models)." source
    3. "It's a bit of a quirky amp and kind of a one-trick pony but, man, what a trick." source
    4. "Yes, it's actually not a very high gain amp. The topology is very similar to a JCM800." source
    5. "The key to the CCV sound is the Sat Switch."
  • Yek's write-up.

CAMERON CCV 1B

See above.

CAMERON CCV 2A

See above.

CAMERON CCV 2B

See above.

CAMERON CCV 2C

See above.

CAMERON CCV 2D

See above.

CAPT HOOK 1A (based on Hook Captain 34)

Capt34.jpg

  • Based on: Hook Captain 34 (version 2), a boutique JCM 800-based 3-channel amp, 100 watts, EL34 power tubes, single input.
  • Suggested cabs: V30, G12H, G12-65, WGS.
  • Original controls on channel 1: Gain (with Pull function), Level, Bass, Mid, Treble, Boost switch, EQ-bypass switch, Bright switch. Original controls on channels 2 and 3: Gain, Level, Bass, Mid, Treble, Boost switch, Edge switch (changes tone stack). Global controls: Presence, Balls (depth/resonance).
  • Models:
    • 1A: Channel 1 w/ EQ and Boost switches off.
    • 1B: Channel 1 w/ EQ and Boost switches on.
    • 2A: Channel 2 with Edge switch off.
    • 2B: Channel 2 with Edge switch on.
    • 3A: Channel 3 with Edge switch off.
    • 3B: Channel 3 with Edge switch on.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "This amp uses a mu follower which yields a complex distortion with smooth decay. To simulate the Boost switch use the Boost switch in the amp block as it has the same amount of gain."​ source
    2. "A mu follower is similar to a cascode configuration except the output is off the cathode instead of the plate. So the output impedance is lower." source
    3. (to mimic Pull Gain on clean channel) "Just set the Tonestack Type to Hook Clean 2." source
    4. "The Capt. Hook's "thing" is that it's basically a JCM800 with the cathode follower replaced by a mu-follower. A mu-follower doesn't compress and distort like a cathode follower does. This results in the amp sounding more open and smoother." source
  • Yek's write-up.

CAPT HOOK 1B

See above.

CAPT HOOK 2A

See above.

CAPT HOOK 2B

See above.

CAPT HOOK 3A

See above.

CAPT HOOK 3B

See above.

CAR ROAMER (based on Carr Rambler)

Rambler.jpg

  • Based on: Car Rambler, similar to a Fender. 6L6 tubes, 28w pentode/14w triode switch, cathode bias.
  • Suggested cabs: Carr, 12" Eminence Elsinore, Fender 12", EVM. Stock cab(s): Roamer.
  • Original controls: Reverb, Tremolo, Pentode/Triode, Volume, Treble, Middle, Bass.
  • Mid control: "Varies the mid frequencies and is very influential in taking the tone from a 60’s blackface sound (minimum to 11 o’clock) to a pushed tweed mid sound (11 o’clock to full)".
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "It's basically a Deluxe Reverb preamp with a cathode bias 6L6 power amp and no negative feedback. Sort of a Fender-meets-Vox thing." source
  • Yek's write-up.

CAROL-ANN OD-2 (based on Carol-Ann OD-2)

Od2.jpg

  • Based on: Carol-Ann OD-2. The model was fine-tuned by the highly respected Alan Phillips himself. 6L6 tubes. Model: Overdrive channel.
  • Suggested cabs: Dumble, EVM, Classic Lead 80.
  • Original controls: Master, Pre Gain (model: Input Drive), Drive (model: Overdrive), Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence, Sparkle, Shift switch.
  • Alan Phillips: "In the real world the OD2 is very very fussy on speaker choice too. The real world speakers of choice are EVM12L in a 1x12 rear ported and 2x12 with Celestion Classic Lead 80's. I found the 12L emulation did a pretty good job. Some of the others sounded so artificial with that model. Like a Rockman. Coupled with the right cab the emulated model does a good job of representing the basic tonal signature of the amp". And: "It's not a competitive model, it's a live demo of an OD2 as tweaked by me. Damn sight better than sound clips for auditioning to guys that haven't got the ability to get to a Dealer. Clearly it doesn't give you the full experience of the full amp, but is a good tonal taster. I repaired a Soldano SLO for him one day and when he came over my house to pick it up we just decided it would be a good idea to put a CA model in there. Having the actual builder involved kind of closes the loop fully. I'm happy to endorse that model because I put a lot of hours testing it and putting together a ton of technical information, fourier analysis graphs, frequency response graphs, schematics etc that would make validation of a mathematical model much easier. In reality even though the power amp and the preamp are modeled the pre-amp got the most effort. As I said in another thread, I tuned that by putting the axe in to the actual power amp of an OD2 and running that side by side with a full OD2. The final tweaks were made like that using parametric eq blocks that were hard coded in to the model. You could call that the icing on the cake and basically put the same level of tuning into the model as I do with a actual OD2. The only difference was I was using a GUI, not resistors and capacitors."
  • Yek's write-up.

CAROL-ANN TRIPTIK CLASSIC (based on Carol-Ann Triptik)

Triptik.jpg

  • Based on: Carol-Ann Triptik, 50 watts, EL34 tubes, three channels.
  • Suggested cabs: various. Stock cab(s): Triptik.
  • Original controls: Input Level (model: Input Drive), Drive on channels 2 and 3 (model: Overdrive), Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence, Master, Classic/Modern voicing switching.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "This TripTik is badass. Dumble meets Marshall with a sprinkle of 5150 power amp." source
    2. "I think what people like about this amp is the same reason people like the BE/HBE. These amps share the same aggressive low-cut on the input and then add bass back in the power amp. This gives clear bass response without getting flubby." source
  • Alan Phillips from Carol-Ann (about the Classic mode): "On the real amp, you would set the Input level at 2 O'clock and the Gain at 1 to 2 O'clock to get a great classic rock rhythm tone. It's not overly different in character to the modern setting, less gain and less low end essentially." source
  • Yek's write-up.

CAROL-ANN TRIPTIK CLEAN

See above.

CAROL-ANN TRIPTIK MODERN

See above.

CAROL-ANN TUCANA CLEAN (based on Carol-Ann Tucana 3)

Tucana.jpg

  • Based on: Carol-Ann Tucana 3 clean and lead channels. This is a 3-channel amp (lead channels 2 and 3 are the same) with a Bias monitoring system, KT88 tubes, 75 watts.
  • Suggested cabs: G12-65, V30, G12-75.
  • Original controls: Input Level (Clean and Overdrive channels), Bass/Mid/Treble (Clean and Overdrive channels), Gain (Overdrive channels), Master (all channels), Presence.
  • Carol-Ann:
    1. "Now I can only speak for the actual amp, but my preference of speaker is a Celestion Creamback 65, though I gig these regularly with a 2x12 with Celestion T75's. Its pretty forgiving on speakers compared with some models. The foot controller and bias monitor are two of the wonderful features of the actual amp, but are both moot in the model......unless Cliff wants to model the effects of real world mains power fluctuations from place to place, but the 'green zone' of the bias monitor is 62-65% plate idle dissipation power and it measures and compensates for plate voltage and screen power , which means the real amp runs best at a slightly cooler bias. The bias monitor just allows you to set that consistently from venue to venue regardless of the main power." source
    2. "It's very very difficult for anyone to get a bad tone out of the real amp. It's designed that way, the range and limits on the controls, even the biasmon system makes it difficult for even a very inexperienced player to FU. The real amp has a more British overtone to it due to the fact I am British and I designed it. The gain staging, overdrive voicing and output stage are night and day to ANYTHING Mesa, any owner of the real amp would attest to that." source
    3. "The Tuc 3 is very very tolerant of most cabs and speakers, unlike say the OD2. I feel people need to approach this model very simply. Don't mess with extended parameters, basically don't try and redesign it. Use a reliable Celestion based cabinet model. I have a fantastic 4x12 with 2 old greenbacks and two old v30s that is the best cab I've played the real amp through. In actual levels of gain with the two adjustable gain controls, the amp has a maximum gain level very similar to the Triptik, the setting of these two controls with respect to each other is critical." source
    4. "Real world, it has the same amount of actual gain as the Triptik. Way more than most people would need for recording or live playing. Input gain on 10 o clock, gain on 2 o clock is a 70s /80s lead tone, put the input level up to 2 o click and it's a very sustained lead tone or a very modern heavy rhythm tone." source
    5. "You don't need to crank the real amp to get a ton of overdrive. I actually designed the original for myself and I play in a rock cover band. There's nowhere I would ever be able to get the amp to the point of pushing the power tubes in to overdrive. You gain stage a design based on its application. For a design that needs a lot of overdrive at a low volume, you do most of that and the harmonic makeup in the preamp. The Tucana falls in to this category. The master volumes in a 500 seat club rarely get above 10 O Clock on the real amp and at that point there's still tons of clean headroom left. Of course the power amp adds to the harmonic content, but it adds very little overdrive. Another interesting point to note is that the Tucana has a high pass filter in the power amp feedback loop, which gives you a nice tight low end because the bass is subjected to more gain. For an amp designed to be pushed hard in to power tube overdrive, this should be omitted as all bets are off in the feedback loop when you hit the rails. In other words that filter requires headroom to function properly, as does the presence control of any amp where it's a component of the feedback loop." source
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "One of the best amps in the world IMO. I have a Dumble and a Trainwreck and various other boutique amps and the Tucana is better than all of them." source
  • Yek's write-up.

CAROL-ANN TUCANA LEAD

See above.

CITRUS A30 CLEAN (based on Orange AD30HTC)

Ad30.jpg

  • Based on: Orange AD30HTC, 30 watts Class A tube head, two channels, EL84 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: Orange, V30. Stock cab(s): Citrus.
  • Original controls: Gain, Master, Bass, Middle, Treble.
  • Yek's write-up.

CITRUS A30 DIRTY

See above.

CITRUS BASS 200 (based on Orange AD200B)

Orangebass.jpg

  • Based on: Orange AD200B 200 watts bass head with 6550 tubes.
  • Original controls: Volume, Gain, Bass, Middle, Treble.
  • Yek's write-up.

CITRUS RV50 (based on Orange Rockerverb 50 MK II)

Rockerverb50.jpg

  • Based on: 50W Orange Rockerverb MK II, a 50 watts head known for warmth and rich harmonics. EL34 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: Orange, V30. Stock cab(s): Citrus.
  • Original controls on dirty channel: Volume, Gain, Treble, Middle, Bass, Reverb.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The model is based on a MKII." source
  • Yek's write-up.

CITRUS TERRIER (based on Orange Tiny Terror)

Tinyterror.jpg

  • Based on: Orange Tiny Terror, 7 - 15 watts (modeled: 15 watts), EL84 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: Orange, G12H. Stock cab(s): Citrus.
  • Original controls: Volume, Gain, Tone (model: HiCut), 7w/15w switch.
  • Release notes: "The tone control is actually a high cut control in the power amp and is therefore replicated by the Hi Cut parameter. The Hi Cut set fully CCW is equivalent to the amp’s tone knob fully CW. The model uses a neutral tone stack. Set T/M/B to noon for authentic sounds or adjust to taste."
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "It's inaudible when clean." source
  • Yek's write-up.

CLASS-A 15W TB (based on Vox AC15 Top Boost)

Ac15.jpg

  • Based on: Vox AC-15. The heart of this amp’s tone comes from its power section and no negative feedback. 15 watts, EL84 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: G12M, Alnico, Vox. Stock cab(s): Class-A.
  • Original controls: Volume, Cut (model: Hi-Cut), Bass, Treble.
  • Yek's write-up.

CLASS-A 30W (based on Vox AC30HW)

Ac30.jpg

  • Based on: Vox AC-30, a combo that dominated the British Invasion, and Vox AC-30TB. Gritty character, warm tone, great feel. 30 watts, EL84 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: Alnico, G12M, Vox. Stock cab(s): Class-A.
  • Original controls AC-30: Volume, Tone (model: Hi-Cut), Bass, Treble, Bright switch, Hot/Cool switch.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "Note that the particular AC-30 used for the model has this scratchy high end. This is reflected in the high Dyn Pres value. It's a hand-wired version and that can lead to this type of sound as the parasitics cause boosting of the very high frequencies when the amp is driven hard. The obvious solution is to turn Dyn Pres down." source
    2. "I intentionally limited the midrange notch since, IMO, it's a design flaw in that tone stack. But you can recover that behavior by setting the Mid control fully CCW. Modern AC30's don't have this flaw. They use a Fender-style tone stack with a fixed mid resistor." source
    3. "The bright cap value is normalized to a Drive pot of 1M. An AC30 has a 500K pot so the value will read out as half the actual value. IOW, it's displaying 60 pF which is equivalent to 120 pF." source
    4. "The Hot model models the AC-30HW model set to Hot. This bypasses the EQ for more gain. For authenticity, leave all tone controls at noon."
    5. "AC30's have no negative feedback on the power amp. This means the output voltage follows the speaker impedance. Therefore you get a boost at the low frequency resonance of the speaker which causes the low end to get loose when you crank it." source
  • Yek's write-up.

CLASS-A 30W BRIGHT

See above.

CLASS-A 30W HOT

See above.

CLASS-A 30W TB

See above.

COMET 60 (based on Komet 60)

Komet60.jpg

  • Based on: Komet 60 (which is based on a Trainwreck), 50 - 60 watts, EL34 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: G12M, G12H, AlNiCo, G12-65.
  • Original controls: Volume, Treble, Middle, Bass, Presence, Hi Cut (not modeled), Touch Response (Fast/Gradual).
  • See notes below about Input Trim and Hi-Cut.
  • Yek's write-up.

COMET CONCOURSE (based on Komet Concorde)

Kometconcorde.jpg

  • Based on: Komet Concorde (which is based on a Trainwreck), 50 - 60 watts, EL34 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: G12M, G12H, AlNiCo, G12-65.
  • Original controls: Volume, Treble, Middle, Bass, Presence, Hi Cut (not modeled), Touch Response (Fast/Gradual).
  • Firmware 10.06 release notes: "This model was matched with the Response switch in the “Fast” position. To replicate the “Slow” position reduce the Input Trim to approximately 0.25".
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The model does not have the hi-cut control." source
  • Yek's write-up.

CORNFED M50 (based on Cornford MK50 II)

Cornford.png

  • Based on: Cornford MK50 II, a boutique British amp. Plexi-meets-Modern tone with big cojones. 50 watts, EL34 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: V30.
  • Original controls: Gain (model: Input Drive), Overdrive (model: Over-Drive), Bass, Middle (500Hz), Treble, Master, Presence, Resonance (model: Depth).
  • Before the Axe-Fx III, this model was named "Corncob".
  • Yek's write-up.

DAS METALL (based on Diezel VH4)

Vh4.jpg

See Dizzy.

DELUXE TWEED (based on Fender Tweed Deluxe, 5E3)

Deluxe.jpg

  • Based on a narrow panel Fender Deluxe (5E3), the earliest and most popular of the so-called Tweed amplifiers. 12 - 15 watts, 6V6 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: Fender 12" (P12R, C12N), Alnico. Stock cab(s): Tweed Deluxe.
  • Original controls: Volume, Tone (model: Treble).
  • Release notes firmware 8: "Note that this amp only has a single tone control. This is modeled by the Treble control in the Axe-Fx II. The Bass and Mid controls are functional and recreate the amp when set to noon. Also note that this amp suffers from extreme blocking distortion at or near maximum gain. This is common in very old designs. As it is virtually unplayable like this, the model uses a somewhat reduced level of grid conduction to lower the amount of blocking distortion and make the amp more playable at high Drive settings."
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The G3 version of the 5E3 Deluxe Tweed model is a hoot. Totally unpredictable, nasty, gnarly and raunchy. I couldn't stop playing it yesterday. Just like the real amp you have to be careful with your volume control and how you approach the amp so that you keep it right on the edge of playability. So cool." source
    2. "The Deluxe Tweed amp model is a 5E3. The 1x12 Deluxe Tweed Mix cab is the IR." source
    3. "Yup, that's the key. Crank the treble almost all the way up." source
  • Yek's write-up.

DELUXE VERB NORMAL (based on Fender blackface Deluxe Reverb, AB763)

Deluxereverb.jpg

  • Based on: '65 blackface Fender Deluxe Reverb. Great, chimey tone with nice power amp breakup when you push the Master. AB763 circuit, 22 watts. Low and high inputs, 6V6 tubes, Normal and Vibrato channels (both modeled).
  • Suggested cabs: Fender 1x12" (C12Q), EVM 12L, JBL D120, or 2x10" (C10N, C10Q, P10R). Stock cab(s): Deluxe Verb.
  • Original controls: Volume, Bass, Treble. Plus Reverb and Vibrato.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "A DR is numbered 1-10 so 3 on a DR is around 2.2 on the Axe-Fx. The model is based on the Vibrato input #1 which has more gain than the normal input. To simulate plugging into the #2 jack (which has half the gain) set Input Trim to 0.5." source
    2. "We got our reference Deluxe Reverb out of storage today, hooked it up and measured and compared. Gain measures spot-on and A/B testing sounds identical. With a Suhr Modern guitar with stock pickups both the amp and the model were starting to break up around 3 (which equals 2.2 on the Axe-Fx since the knobs start at zero not one). A Deluxe Reverb breaks up easily since it has 6V6 power tubes. The preamp is virtually identical to a Twin Reverb but 6V6s break up earlier than 6L6s. For a given voltage into the power amp a 6V6 has about 70% of the headroom compared to a 6L6." source
    3. "The values for the Deluxe Reverb model are based on measurements of an actual 65 Deluxe Reverb, not some hypothetical values on some spec sheet." source
  • Yek's write-up.

DELUXE VERB VIBRATO

See above.

DIRTY SHIRLEY (based on Friedman Dirty Shirley, regular version)

Dirtyshirley.jpg

  • Based on: the regular version of the Dirty Shirley amp by Dave Friedman of Rack Systems, designed to be an ultra Fat Sweet sounding Classic Rock Amp, based on a modified JTM-45. 5881 tubes, 40 watts, single channel, two inputs.
  • Suggested cabs: G12M, G12-65, G12H, V30, Marshall. Stock cab(s): 4x12 FAS.
  • Original controls: Gain, Master, Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence.
  • Cliff's comments (about Friedman amps):
    1. "If you want more clarity in the low mids (...) reduce Negative Feedback. Friedman's designs are a bit odd in that he takes the feedback off the speaker jack rather than off a transformer tap. (...) The amp will sound tighter and clearer in the low mids." source
    2. "The design is weird as the negative feedback is taken off the speaker jack. So if you use a 16-ohm speaker you get more feedback (and much more bass) than if you use an 8-ohm speaker. (...) It's too much bass for me so I turn down the Depth and reduce Negative Feedback a bit." source
    3. "At first I didn't like it but for some genres it works. The old version (new model) has a 2.2 nF cap on the cathode follower while the newer version has 4.7 nF. The larger cap smooths out the distortion. The cathode bypass cap values are different as well which changes the midrange response." source
  • "I always lower the negative feedback. Friedman amps are a bit strange because the negative feedback is taken off the speaker jack instead of one of the transformer taps. The matching cabs are 16 ohms but if you use an 8-ohm cab you'll get 30% less feedback." source
  • Yek's write-up.

DIRTY SHIRLEY 2 (based on Friedman Dirty Shirley, earlier version)

Dirtyshirley.jpg

  • See above.
  • This model is based on an earlier version of the Dirty Shirley with some different component values, a little more aggressive than the regular model.

DIV/13 CJ (based on Divided By 13 CJ 11)

Cj11.jpg

  • Based on: Divided By 13 CJ 11, which is based on a 1959 tweed Fender amp made in Fullerton. 1x12 combo, 11 watts, single channel, two inputs, Class A, 6V6 tubes. Models: non-boosted and boosted (volume knob pulled out).
  • Suggested cabs: Divided by 13, G12M. Stock cab(s): Division13.
  • Original controls: Volume (pull: Boost), Treble, Bass, Master.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "It is a bassy amp. Works best with single coils." source
    2. "You increase the LOW CUT FREQ to reduce the fuzziness on bass notes but then it won't sound like the real thing." source
  • Yek's write-up.

DIV/13 CJ BOOST

See above.

DIV/13 FT37 HIGH (based on Divided By 13 FTR 37)

Ftr37.jpg

  • Based on: Divided By 13 FTR 37, 37 watts, Class-AB, two channels, two inputs, 6V6 tubes, push/pull Mid/Gain Boost. “LO” model: first channel with Gain Boost off, “HI” model: first channel with Gain Boost on.
  • Suggested cabs: Division13, combo of G12H and Alnico. Stock cab(s): Division13 (Divided by 1 CJ cabinet).
  • Original controls: Volume (pull: Boost), Treble, Bass.
  • Yek's write-up.

DIV/13 FT37 LOW

See above.

DIZZY V4 BLUE 2 (based on Diezel VH4 with blue faceplate)

Vh4blue.jpg

  • Based on: Diezel VH4, a high-gain, boutique amp famous for its powerful, heavy, aggressive sound. 4 channels, 100 watts, 6550/6L6 tubes. Models: Channel 2 Crunch (raw), Channel 3 Mega (heavy rhythm) and Channel 4 Lead (more mids than 3) of a blue faceplate and a silver faceplate VH4. The blue model is older and sounds darker.
  • Suggested cabs: V30, G12-100.
  • Original controls: Gain, Volume, Bass, Mid, Treble, Presence (4kHz), Deep (80Hz), Bright switch (not on channels 3 and 4).
  • The separate Das Metal model was done by schematic and/or by ear (source). The Blue and Silver VH4 models are based on real amps.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "People think the VH4 is a metal amp which it most definitely is not. It's a mid-gain amp. If you try to use it for detuned death-metal it won't sound good because that's not its intended usage." source
    2. (Quantum 1.00) "The Dizzy and Herbie models were completely redone as I figured out the secret to the Diezel sound." source
  • Yek's write-up.

DIZZY V4 BLUE 3

See above.

DIZZY V4 BLUE 4

See above.

DIZZY V4 SILVER 2 (based on Diezel VH4 with silver faceplate)

Vh4.jpg

Same as above but based on the model with the silver faceplate.

DIZZY V4 SILVER 3

See above.

DIZZY V4 SILVER 4

See above.

DOUBLE VERB NORMAL (based on '66 Fender blackface Twin Reverb)

Twin.jpg

  • Based on: Twin Reverb, an indispensable icon, known for amazing cleans. The "Double Verb NRM/VIB" models are based on a '66 blackface Fender Twin Reverb, tuned by Andy Fuchs, AB763 circuit, 6L6 tubes, low and high inputs, 85 watts, Normal and Vibrato channels. The “Double Verb SF” model is based on the Vibrato channel of a 1971 100 watts “Silverface” Fender Twin Reverb.
  • Suggested cabs: 2x12 Jensen C12N, JBL D120, EVM. Stock cab(s): 2x12 Double Verb.
  • Original controls: Volume, Bass, Middle, Treble, Bright switch. Not modeled: Reverb and Vibrato controls.
  • The Vibrato channel breaks up earlier than the Normal channel.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. To make the Twin cleaner: "Reduce MV (or MV Trim). The biggest reason Silverface Twins were cleaner is because the PI had less gain. Reducing the MV or MV Trim will simulate the lower gain." source
    2. (about the original Double Verb model) "The Twin Reverb that the model is based on breaks up like that. The model is MIMIC'd and is extremely accurate. It's a Blackface Twin which breaks up easy compared to later Twins. Furthermore, as with all models, it is modeled on the "Hi" input. If you don't want it to break up as easy turn Input Trim to 0.5 to simulate using the "Low" input, reduce Input Drive and MV as necessary. You may want to turn the Bright Switch off as well. People who want squeaky clean usually turn the Bright Switch off on these amps. However, you'd be surprised that a Twin isn't nearly as clean as you think. It's just so damn loud that you get the sensation that it's clean because a light touch on the strings creates a lot of volume." source
    3. "The model is extremely accurate and is based on a 1966 Blackface Twin Reverb. Part of the reason the Blackface era are so sought after is because they distort. They are NOT clean amps by any stretch." source
    4. "A Dual Showman with the AB763 circuit has one less gain stage than a Twin Reverb so it will have less gain. There are two gain stages. The Vibrato channel of an AB763 Twin Reverb has three gain stages. An AA769 Dual Showman Reverb on the Vibrato channel will have similar gain as it has three gain stages. The circuit number, i.e. AB763, does not mean that the circuits are identical. It refers to the circa of the design. An AB763 Dual Showman is not the same circuit as an AB763 Twin Reverb." source
  • Yek's write-up.

DOUBLE VERB SILVERFACE (based on '71 Fender silverface Twin Reverb)

See above.

DOUBLE VERB VIBRATO (based on '66 Fender blackface Twin Reverb)

See above.

DWEEZIL'S BASSGUY (modded '65 blackface Fender Bassman, AB165)

Ab165.png

  • Based on: Bass-channel of 1965 blackface Fender Bassman with AB165 circuit (CBS-era), modded by Blankenship. High and low inputs, 6L6 tubes, 50 watts.
  • Suggested cabs: Fender 2x12.
  • Original controls: no tonestack, just Volume, fixed Presence circuit (Presence should be at 10).
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "Definitely not your father's Bassman. Has a pissed-off Marshall vibe to it."
    2. "The AB165 uses 7025 preamp tubes (which are relabeled 12AX7). The phase inverter, however, is a 12AT7. The secret to the AB165 is the summing stage. It uses a inverting summing amp to sum the Normal and Bass inputs. This stage clips, because of all the local negative feedback, quite hard."
    3. (Quantum 3) "It's Dweezil's Blankenship modified Bassman. Dweezil's Bassman has two channels like a regular Bassman. The Normal channel is "normal" and corresponds to the 65 Bassguy Nrml model. The Bass Instrument channel is modified and that's the basis for the new model (Dweezil's B-man). It has a boatload of gain and sounds more like a Plexi than a Fender." source
    4. "The actual amp has no tone stack so for maximum authenticity all tone controls would be at noon (but don't be afraid to tweak them). In the actual amp the Treble control is re-purposed as a Negative Feedback control. Experiment with different values of Negative Feedback. Lower values are looser." source
  • Yek's write-up.

ENERGYBALL (based on Engl Powerball)

Powerball.jpg

  • Based on: Engl Powerball, a very high-gain German model with lots of bass, great for aggressive, drop-tuned riff work. 100 watts, single input, 6L6 tubes, two channels, two modes per channel (Open and Focussed). Modeled: lead channel.
  • Suggested cabs: V30, Engl. Stock cab(s): 4x12 German.
  • Original controls: Gain, Volume, Bass, Mid-Open, Mid-Focused, Treble, Presence, Punch Depth, Bottom, Open or Focused (boosts 300-500 Hz) mode.
  • Yek's write-up.

EURO BLUE (based on Bogner Ecstasy 20th Ann.)

Ecstasy.png

  • Based on: Bogner Ecstasy (XTC), 20th Anniversary model, 6L6 tubes (source), 100 watts, single input. Blue/Red models: Structure switch set to Vintage. Blue Mdrn/Red Mdrn: Structure switch set to Modern.
  • Suggested cabs: V30, G12M, Bogner. Stock cab(s): 4x12 German Boutique.
  • Original controls: Gain, Master, Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence, Bright switch, Structure switch (gain reduction), Old/New Style switch, Excursion switch, Gain switch, Plexi Mode.
  • You can turn the amp model into a pedal.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "People think Bogners are dark but they really aren't. The reason they seem that way is the pot tapers. Most people assume knobs should be set somewhere around noon. If you do this on a Bogner it's like turning the treble way down on a Marshall. Close your eyes and adjust the tone controls with your ears. Don't be afraid to turn them way up or way down." source
    2. "Human nature is to put the knobs near noon. We are reticent to deviate much from noon. Amp designers exploit this and use different tapers to change the sound of their amps WITH THE KNOBS AT NOON. A prime example are Bogner amps. Everyone says "Bogner amps are dark". No they aren't. But he uses a Log10A taper for the treble pot. It's a standard Marshall tone stack. Usually a linear taper pot is used for the treble. The treble knob at 5.0 (noon) on a Bogner is equivalent to the treble knob at 1.0 on a Marshall. People put the knob at 5.0 and go "wow, this amp is dark". No it isn't. If you turned the treble up to 8 or 9 it would sound a lot like a Plexi but humans are reticent to turn the knobs to extremes. Amp designers know this and exploit it to give their amps a "signature sound"." source
    3. "Our reference amp is a a 20th anniversary and N is Bright Off, B1 is 150 pF and B2 is 1000 pF for both channels. The models default to B1. Change the Bright Cap value to 1 nF to emulate B2. Or better yet use your ears to select a value that sounds best." source
  • Yek's write-up.

EURO BLUE MODERN

See above.

EURO RED

See above.

EURO RED MODERN

See above.

EURO UBER (based on Bogner Uberschall)

Uber.png

  • Based on: Bogner Uberschall, the high gain channel of this head, with heavy grinding lows and insane gain. Single input, probably EL34 power tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: Bogner Uberkab, combo of G12-75 and V30. Stocks cab: 4x12 Uber.
  • Original controls: Gain, Master, Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence.
  • Presence and Middle are very important to sculpt the tone.
  • You can turn the amp model into a pedal.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "People think Bogners are dark but they really aren't. The reason they seem that way is the pot tapers. Most people assume knobs should be set somewhere around noon. If you do this on a Bogner it's like turning the treble way down on a Marshall. Close your eyes and adjust the tone controls with your ears. Don't be afraid to turn them way up or way down." source
    2. "Human nature is to put the knobs near noon. We are reticent to deviate much from noon. Amp designers exploit this and use different tapers to change the sound of their amps WITH THE KNOBS AT NOON. A prime example are Bogner amps. Everyone says "Bogner amps are dark". No they aren't. But he uses a Log10A taper for the treble pot. It's a standard Marshall tone stack. Usually a linear taper pot is used for the treble. The treble knob at 5.0 (noon) on a Bogner is equivalent to the treble knob at 1.0 on a Marshall. People put the knob at 5.0 and go "wow, this amp is dark". No it isn't. If you turned the treble up to 8 or 9 it would sound a lot like a Plexi but humans are reticent to turn the knobs to extremes. Amp designers know this and exploit it to give their amps a "signature sound"." source
    3. "The feedback circuit is responsible for the behavior of the Presence and Depth controls. Certain Bogners and Diezels have a unique type of feedback circuit. There are no new parameters and nothing to do except twist the Presence and Depth knobs to your desired tone. Note that an Uberschall doesn't have a Depth knob. The default Depth value when you select the Euro Uber model is equivalent to the amp's fixed depth circuit." source
  • Yek's write-up.

FAS 6160 (custom model, based on Peavey 5150)

Logo small.png

  • Custom Fractal model, a modified version of the PVH 6160 Block (original EVH 5150) - less fizzy than the original, with a bouncier feel.
  • Yek's write-up.

FAS BASS (custom model)

Logo small.png

FAS BROOTALZ (custom model)

Logo small.png

  • Custom Fractal model, "brings teh brootalz".
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "This amp was an accident. I was working on the Savage model and accidentally used the input stage from an SLO100. So it's the front end of an SLO100 with the back end of a Savage. It's probably an SLO100 power amp too but I'd have to check." source
  • Yek's write-up.

FAS BROWN (custom model)

Logo small.png

  • Custom Fractal model, the original BROWN model from the Axe-Fx Standard/Ultra.
  • See Brit Brown model for information.
  • Yek's write-up.

FAS CLASS-A (custom model, based on Vox)

Logo small.png

  • "A “Blackface” preamp into a cathode-biased 6L6 power amp with no negative feedback. This was a happy accident when originally modeling the Carr Rambler in the beta version of this release. Several mistakes were made in the model prior to MIMIC’ing the amp but the model was so well liked that we decided to make it into its own custom amp model."
  • Yek's write-up.

FAS CRUNCH (custom model)

Logo small.png

  • Custom Fractal model, Fractal Audio's take on the ultimate British-sounding amp (Plexi). More dynamic/open plus more gain.
  • Yek's write-up.

FAS HOT ROD (custom model, based on a modded Marshall)

Logo small.png

  • Custom Fractal model.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "FAS Hot Rod is my version of what a modded Marshall should be. I find the BE/HBE a little too boomy and scooped. Bogners are too dark. Splawns don't have enough compression. Etc. So it's my take on a hot-rodded Marshall tone." source
  • Yek's write-up.

FAS LEAD 1 (custom model)

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  • Custom Fractal model, neutral high-gain lead with a tight midrange.
  • Yek's write-up.

FAS LEAD 2 (custom model)

Logo small.png

  • Custom Fractal model, hot-rodded British lead sound with a tonestack by Custom Audio Electronics.
  • Yek's write-up.

FAS MODERN (custom model)

Logo small.png

  • A high gain hybrid tone that’s equally suited to modern rhythm and lead work.
  • To reduce the harshness, turn down Presence.
  • Cliffs comments:
    1. "This model is my interpretation of the ideal modern metal tone. In the digital realm we are not constrained by the limitations that face tube amp designers so we are free to implement designs that would be nearly impossible with a tube amp. The Axe-Fx II modeling includes a variety of general purpose filters that I can place anywhere in the signal path. So I put some second-order filters in there to tighten up the tone. Implementing second-order filters in a real tube amp is difficult and costly so is rarely seen." source
  • Yek's write-up.

FAS MODERN II (custom model)

Logo small.png

  • Tighter version of the popular FAS Modern model with a 5150-style bass boost in the tone stack.
  • To reduce the harshness, turn down Presence.
  • Yek's write-up.

FAS MODERN III (custom model)

Logo small.png

  • Similar to a Recto but with tighter bass and a cathode-biased power amp.
  • Yek's write-up.

FAS RHYTHM (custom model)

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  • Custom Fractal model, combines the best features of the British and USA crunch models.
  • Yek's write-up.

FAS WRECK (custom model, based on a Trainwreck)

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  • Custom Fractal model, the original WRECKER 1 model from the Axe-Fx Ultra.
  • Yek's write-up.

FOX ODS (based on Fuchs Overdrive Supreme)

Fuchs.jpg

  • Based on: Fuchs Overdrive Supreme, based on an amp that's based on an amp. Overdrive channel, 50 watts, 6L6 tubes. "ODS" model: Deep switch off, "DEEP" model: Deep switch on. The Deep switch shifts the overall tonality of the amplifier, slightly increasing the low frequencies. This is often useful for single-coil guitars, which sometimes need a low-frequency boost. Both models are modeled with the Preamp Bypass (PAB) active.
  • Suggested cabs: Eminence.
  • Original controls: Gain (model: Input Drive), High (pull: mid boost), Mid (pull: gain boost), Low, Input (model: OverDrive), Brite switch, Deep switch, Rock/Jazz switch, Master, Accent (presence/edge).
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "Supposedly a Dumble ODS clone but our reference amp has way more gain than our Dumble." source
  • Yek's write-up.

FOX ODS DEEP

See above.

FRIEDMAN BE (based on Friedman BE-100)

BE.jpg

  • Based on: amp by Dave Friedman of Rack Systems, what many call “the ultimate modded Plexi”. HBE: alternate voicing with a gain boost (preamp triode boost). A killer hi-gain tone in your arsenal. Single input, EL34 tubes, 100 watts.
  • Suggested cabs: V30, G12M, G12H, Marshall. Stock cabs: FAS 4x12 60 and 61.
  • Original controls: Gain, Master, Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence. Switches: FAT (model: FAT), C45 (treble boost), SAT (model: SAT), Voice.
  • Models:
    • The Friedman BE was originally named "Marsha". The non-V1/V2 models are based on this amp.
    • The V1/V2 amp models were added in Quantum 2.03, and are based on Mark Day's BE amp. The V1 models are based on the amp with the Voice switch toggled right (brighter, more bass). The V2 models are based on Voice switch in the left position (darker, more mids). Use them with stock cabs 60 and 61, which are IRs of Mark Day's 4x12 cabinet.
    • The BE C45 model, 2018 HBE and 2018 HBE C45 models were added in firmware Ares and Quantum 10.x.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The old model is an original, hand-built "Marsha". It's MUCH darker than Mark's newer BE/HBE. In fact it's so dark and boomy I emailed Dave to make sure the amp was built correctly. Turns out the snubber cap is the wrong value. But even with the snubber cap corrected it's still very dark and boomy which made me question as to whether there are other components that are incorrect. So we decided to redo the model based on Mark's amp which is the amp that was the demo model at Tone Merchants." source
    2. "The models are based on two different amps. The V1 and V2 are based on Mark Day's BE100. The other models are based on our original "Marsha". Like most boutique amp makers Friedman's designs have evolved over time with changes to the circuit. The original Marsha we have is dark and bassy with lots of lowpass filtering. The newer amp is brighter and tighter. For now note that V1/V2 refer to the newer amp and represent the position of the Voicing switch." source
    3. "The BE/HBE has a fixed depth circuit that gives a lot of bass boost. The model defaults the Depth to match this." source.
    4. "If you want more clarity in the low mids from the BE/HBE reduce Negative Feedback. Friedman's designs are a bit odd in that he takes the feedback off the speaker jack rather than off a transformer tap. The mating cab for a BE/HBE is 16 ohms which means lots of feedback. But if you connect the amp to an 8 ohm load there is about 30% less feedback. The amp will sound tighter and clearer in the low mids." source
    5. "The design is weird as the negative feedback is taken off the speaker jack. So if you use a 16-ohm speaker you get more feedback (and much more bass) than if you use an 8-ohm speaker. The model is based on using the matching cab. It's too much bass for me so I turn down the Depth and reduce Negative Feedback a bit." source
    6. "I always lower the negative feedback. Friedman amps are a bit strange because the negative feedback is taken off the speaker jack instead of one of the transformer taps. The matching cabs are 16 ohms but if you use an 8-ohm cab you'll get 30% less feedback." source
    7. "C45 is a treble boost on the input." source
    8. (Axe-Fx III) "I have one of the very first BE-100s but, on a whim, decided to buy a new one because people said they sound a "little" different. Well... more than a little. They sound very different. I got in touch with Dave to see what he changed and made those two new models." source
    9. Discussion about the Bass control
  • Yek's write-up.

FRIEDMAN BE C45

See above.

FRIEDMAN BE V1

See above.

FRIEDMAN BE V2

See above.

FRIEDMAN HBE

See above.

FRIEDMAN HBE 2018

See above.

FRIEDMAN HBE 2018 C45

See above.

FRIEDMAN HBE V1

See above.

FRIEDMAN HBE V2

See above.

FRIEDMAN SMALL BOX (based on Friedman Smallbox)

Smallbox.jpg

  • Based on: amp by Dave Friedman of Rack Systems. 50 watts, EL34 tubes, two channels. Channel 1 (not modeled): clean/plexi. Channel 2 (modeled): modern hi-gain, based on the BE-100 with more pronounced midrange.
  • Suggested cabs: V30, G12M, G12H, Marshall. Stock cabs: FAS 4x12 60 and 61.
  • Original controls: Gain, Master, Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence. Channel 1: Bright switch.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The schematic shows a 2.2 nF coupling cap off the first stage but the actual amp has a 4.7 nF. 2.2 nF would mean less bass. I can only assume the amp was built to the latest specs. If an amp model is "G3'd" it is deadly accurate. I go through the amps and check the values of each component, measure the voltages, compare the frequency response to the model, etc., etc., etc. If the model is too bassy for you then you would find the real amp too bassy, or at least our particular reference model." source
    2. (about Friedman amps) "If you want more clarity in the low mids (...) reduce Negative Feedback. Friedman's designs are a bit odd in that he takes the feedback off the speaker jack rather than off a transformer tap. (...) The amp will sound tighter and clearer in the low mids." source
    3. (about Friedman amps) "The design is weird as the negative feedback is taken off the speaker jack. So if you use a 16-ohm speaker you get more feedback (and much more bass) than if you use an 8-ohm speaker. (...) It's too much bass for me so I turn down the Depth and reduce Negative Feedback a bit." source
    4. "I always lower the negative feedback. Friedman amps are a bit strange because the negative feedback is taken off the speaker jack instead of one of the transformer taps. The matching cabs are 16 ohms but if you use an 8-ohm cab you'll get 30% less feedback." source
  • Yek's write-up.

FRYETTE D60 LESS (based on Fryette Deliverance 60)

Fryette.jpg

  • Based on: Fryette Amplification Deliverance 60 in the "Less" (3 gain stages) resp. "More" (4 gain stages) mode. 60 watts, KT88 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: Fryette P50E, Fane F70G.
  • Original controls: Gain 1 (model: Input Drive), Gain 2 (model: OverDrive), Volume, Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence, Depth, More/Less switch.
  • Yek's write-up.

FRYETTE D60 MORE

See above.

GIBTONE SCOUT (based on Gibson Scout)

Gibson.jpg

  • Based on: Gibson GA17RVT Scout (1964). If you love vintage clean tones, this 17-watter got 'em. 17 watts, two inputs, 6AQ5 tube.
  • Suggested cabs: single Gibson 10".
  • Original controls: Volume, no tone controls. Reverb and tremolo not modeled.
  • Yek's write-up.

HERBIE CH2+ (based on Diezel Herbert)

Herbert.jpg

  • Based on: Diezel Herbert, three-channel head (and channel 2 has two voicings), called looser and more familiar than the VH4. 180 watts, KT66/KT77 tubes, single input. Channel 2- with gain at around 35% gives you a cranked Plexi tone, at around 60% JCM 800 tone. Channel 2+ gets you into VH4 territory.
  • Suggested cabs: V30, G12-100.
  • Original controls: Gain (not on channel 1), Bass, Middle (1 kHz), Treble, Master, Presence (> 3kHz), Deep (120Hz), Mid-Cut (not modeled), Gain Boost switch (not modeled).
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. (Quantum 1.00) "The Dizzy and Herbie models were completely redone as I figured out the secret to the Diezel sound." source
    2. (to reproduce the Mid Cut function) "Use a Peak EQ filter at 400 Hz with a Q of 1.4. Decrease its Gain until the desired scoop is achieved. Play with the Q to set the width of the scoop." source

HERBIE CH2-

See above.

HERBIE CH3

See above.

HIPOWER BRILLIANT (based on Hiwatt DR103)

Hiwatt.jpg

  • Based on: Hiwatt DR103, an amp with an unique tone-stack and a brilliant chimey tone. Normal and Brilliant channels, 100 watts, EL34 tubes, two inputs per channel. The jumpered type is modeled with the 4 inputs jumpered.
  • Suggested cabs: 12" Fane. Stock cab(s): Hipower.
  • Original controls: Volume, Master, Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "I have a 1974 Hiwatt DR-103. The model is based on that. It is one of the Harry Joyce, Hylight era models. Still has the original tubes. Closet find and sounds glorious."
  • Yek's write-up.

HIPOWER JUMPED

See above.

HIPOWER NORMAL

See above.

HOT KITTY (based on Bad Cat Hot Cat 30)

Hotcat.jpg

  • Based on: Bad Cat Hot Cat 30 (channel 2), voted by Guitar Player as "the second best combo of all time". 30 watts, EL34 tubes, cathode bias Class-A, two channels (clean channel not modeled).
  • Suggested cabs: Bad Cat Hot Kitty (proprietary Celestion). Stock cab(s): Hot Kitty.
  • Original controls: Gain, Edge (model: Bright switch), Level, Bass, Middle, Treble, Brilliance (model: Hi-Cut), Master.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "Brilliance is their name for Hi-Cut. I set the Edge control to where I thought it sounded best. It essentially does the same thing as the Bright knob though less precise."
    2. "The amp has a Hi Cut but it's labeled Brilliance. It's wired backwards so turning it CW gets brighter." source
    3. "Those amps make a lot of IMD. The real amp does the same thing but you wouldn't normally use a subwoofer with one." source
  • Yek's write-up.

JMPRE-1 OD1 (based on Marshall JMP-1)

Cliff JMP-1.jpg

  • Based on: Marshall JMP-1 preamp, a rack-mount preamplifier version of the Brit 900, with MIDI, EL34 tubes. OD1 model: "A warm vintage drive reminiscent of Marshall Super Lead amps through to modern day Master Volumes". OD2 model: "This a tightly focused high gain drive which can be smooth or aggressive depending on the E.Q. and gain settings". The models with “BS” in the name indicate that the Bass Shift function is engaged. Bass Shift is a subtle low frequency character control. When selected it thickens the bottom end of the sound and tightens the playing feel. It provides the extra low end “throb” so essential for heavy rock sound. The model defaults to active power amp simulation, based on a typical Marshall 100 watts power amp of that era.
  • Suggested cabs: n/a.
  • Original controls: Volume, Gain, Bass, Mid, Treble, Presence, Bass shift.
  • The JMPRE-1 models were added in firmware Quantum 1.00. There's also a BRIT PRE model based on the JMP-1.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The JMP-1 tone controls have more range than the actual preamp. The preamp has about +/- 8 dB for each tone control while the model has the standard +/- 12 dB."
  • Yek's write-up.

JMPRE-1 OD1 BASS SHIFT

See above.

JMPRE-1 OD2

See above.

JMPRE-1 OD2 BASS SHIFT

See above.

JR BLUES (based on Fender Blues Junior)

Bluesjr.jpg

  • Based on: Fender Blues Jr., a gutsy little classic with dual EL84s. The Jr Blues Fat model is based on the amp with the Fat switch enabled. 15 watts, dual EL84s, single input.
  • Suggested cabs: Eminence 12", Jensen C12N or P12R. Stock cab(s): Junior Blues.
  • Original controls: Bass, Middle, Treble, Gain, Volume, FAT button (boosts gain and midrange frequencies). Reverb not modeled.
  • Use the JR Blues model with no Damping (no negative feedback) to make it sound like an Egnater Rebel 20.:
    1. "The Blues Jr. amp has a fixed presence circuit." source
    2. "The Eggie is very similar to a Blues Jr. Basically the same preamp with some minor tweaks." source
  • Yek's write-up.

JR BLUES FAT

See above.

JS410 CRUNCH ORANGE (based on Marshall JVM410HJS)

Js.jpg

  • Based on: Marshall JVM410HJS, Joe Satriani's 4-channel 100 watts signature amp with EL34 tubes. Each channel has 3 modes, channels 3 and 4 are identical. Crunch OR: based on a JCM 2203. Crunch RD: based on a modded JCM 2203. Lead OR: more gain. Lead RD: even more gain.
  • Suggested cabs: V30+G12-H30.
  • Original controls: Volume, Gain, Bass, Middle, Treble, Master, Presence, Resonance (model: Depth), noise gate (not modeled), Mid-Shift (around 650hz off and around 500hz on, not modeled).
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "Joe said he puts all the tone controls at around 10:00." source
  • Yek's write-up.

JS410 CRUNCH RED

See above.

JS410 LEAD ORANGE

See above.

JS410 LEAD RED

See above.

JAZZ 120 (based on Roland Jazz Chorus JC-120)

Jc120.jpg

  • Based on: Roland Jazz Chorus JC-120, the only solid-state-based model in the collection; a quintessential clean tone. 120 watts (stereo: 2x 60W).
  • Suggested cabs: Roland 12" "silver" AlNiCo.
  • Original controls: Volume, Bass, Mid, Treble, Bright switch. Not modeled: Distortion, Chorus and Reverb controls.
  • The real amp has no Master Volume, crank it. Engage the Bright switch (disabled by default) to add bite.
  • Yek's write-up.

LEGATO 100 (based on Carvin Legacy VL100)

Legacy.jpg

  • Based on: Carvin Legacy VL100 amplifier. 100 watts, EL34 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: Carvin, V30. Stock cab(s): SV Legend.
  • Original controls on Lead channel: Presence, Treble (11kHz), Mid (650Hz), Bass (80Hz), Drive, Volume.
  • The Cali Leggy is another model based on the Carvin Legacy VL100.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The thing that makes a Legacy unique is the tone stack. It uses a "James" tone stack which is more like hi-fi tone controls." source
    2. "The Legato 100 is based on a one-of-a-kind version owned by a certain Californian guitar player. It is a very dark amp. Part of this is due to the tapers on the tone pots. With everything at noon the tone stack looks like a highshelf with a good amount of high frequency cut. The tone stack is a Baxandall which is more common in hi-fi gear than guitar amps. It lends a unique character to the tone." source
    3. "SV's personal settings are: Drive: 7.5, Bass: 6, Mid: 4, Treble: 8, Presence: 8. I had to increase the Mid control on the model to about 5 to match the amp which indicates the mid pot on the amp was greater than spec. This is not unusual. Typical consumer-grade pots have pretty poor tolerance in both end-to-end resistance and resistance at the midpoint." source
  • Yek's write-up.

MATCHBOX D-30 (based on Matchless DC-30)

Dc30.jpg

  • Based on: Matchless DC-30, 30 watts, Class-A, EL84 tubes, two inputs. Channel 1: 12AX7 (modeled, with master volume bypassed). Channel 2 (not modeled): EF86 which delivers more gain.
  • Suggested cabs: combo of 25w G12M and 30w G12H. Stock cab(s): 2x12 Boutique.
  • Original controls: Volume, Bass, Treble (channel 1), Volume, Tone (channel 2). Global controls: Cut (model: Hi Cut), bypassable Master.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The DC-30 is basically an AC-30 copy. The voltages are a bit different but the topology is nearly identical. However, IMO, it does sound better. Not sure why. Perhaps the better quality components. AC-30's have kind of crappy OTs." source
  • "My favorite "Class-A" amp model by far." source
  • (about channel 2) "The switch selects the coupling capacitor between the EF86 and the volume pot." source
  • Yek's write-up.
  • Check the Preamp Bias value. It should be +0.4, but a bug in some firmware versions set it to -0.4 instead. source

MR Z HWY 66 (based on Dr. Z Route 66)

Route66.jpg

  • Based on: Dr. Z Route 66. 32 watts, KT66 power tubes, and EF-86 preamp tube.
  • Suggested cabs: combo of V30 and G12H.
  • Original controls: Volume, Bass, Treble.
  • Treble and bass operate regularly until 12:00, and dial in gain once turned past noon. To put this amp into overdrive, crank all three controls (Volume, Treble, Bass), use humbuckers and possibly an overdrive pedal.
  • Yek's write-up.

MR Z MZ-38 (based on Dr. Z Maz 38 SR)

Maz38.jpg

  • Based on: Dr. Z Maz 38 SR, popular with country and roots players. EL84 tubes, 38 watts, two inputs.
  • Suggested cabs: G12H.
  • Original controls: Volume, Master, Bass, Mid, Treble, Cut (model: Hi Cut). Reverb on some models.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "Dr. Z is the quintessential country amp." source
  • Yek's write-up.

MR Z MZ-8 (based on Dr. Z Maz 8)

Maz8.jpg

  • Based on: Dr. Z Maz 8, a popular low-wattage, single-ended amp, EL84 tubes, 8 watts, two inputs.
  • Suggested cabs: single G12H.
  • Original controls: Volume, Master, Bass, Mid, Treble, Cut (model: Hi Cut). Not modeled: Reverb and Pentode/Triode switch.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "Dr. Z is the quintessential country amp." source
  • Yek's write-up.

NUCLEAR-TONE (based on Swart Atomic Space Tone)

Swart.jpg

  • Based on: Swart Atomic Space Tone (AST), a cool little, gritty, stylishly retro all-tube combo with a tube-powered tremolo. 18-20 watts, 6V6 tubes, low and high inputs.
  • Suggested cabs: single 12" Mojotone BV-25m. Stock cab(s): Nuclear Tone.
  • Original controls: Volume, Tone (model: Treble). Plus reverb and tremolo.
  • Firmware 10 release notes: "As with the actual amp the bias tremolo is particularly effective." (Note: Tremolo in the AMP block is not available on the AX8.)
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "It's unique character comes from the PI. It's a cathodyne phase inverter so it doesn't drive the grids as hard." source
    2. "The real amp is known for it's tremolo so that's why we used the bias trem on the preset. Bias trem works by modulating the power tube grid bias. One of the side-effects is that the effect becomes less pronounced as you play harder which makes it basically "auto ducking". Also since it's modulating the bias it gives an almost Univibe like effect since the phase changes a bit too." source
  • Yek's write-up.

ODS-100 CLEAN (based on Dumble OD Special)

Dumble.jpg

  • Based on: Dumble OD Special, EL34 tubes. A coveted but rare amp brand. Clean and OD channels. Cliff's Dumble has a HRM circuit, serial number 213. "HRM" models: based on HRM circuit. "Ford" models: based on schematics of Robben Ford's #102 Dumble. "Ford 1": PAB On. "Ford 2": PAB Off. "Ford MD": PAB On and Mid switch On. "HRM Mid": Mid switch engaged.
  • Suggested cabs: Dumble, G12-65, EVM. Stock cab(s): 4x12 Rumble.
  • Original controls: Volume (model: Input Drive), Bass, Middle, Treble, Overdrive Level (model: Overdrive), Ratio (Master Volume for the overdrive channel), Master Volume, Presence, Bright switch, Mid boost switch, Jazz/Rock switch, Preamp boost (PAB).
  • Firmware 10: "The preamp bypass (PAB) bypasses the input tone stack. The clean channel has a bright cap on the Master Volume. This causes the tone to get brighter as the MV is reduced and vice-versa".
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The ODS100 has two drive controls, one is right at the input, the other is in the lead boost section."
    2. "I hate to admit it but there is something special about a real Dumble. I don't know what it is but there is something in the voicing. The various clones I have are cool and have their own thing going but they don't sound like the Dumble. Hard amp to play though. Very unforgiving but tremendous clarity." source
    3. "They call HRM "Hot Rubber Monkey" but what it really means is "Hot Rod Marshall". The HRM Dumbles have a fixed Marshall tone stack at the output of the lead channel. This gives a little scoop to the mids." source
    4. "My Dumble is S/N 0213 IIRC. It's an EL-34 ODS HRM." source
    5. "The ODS-100 Ford 2 model is not based on the HRM model with the HRM tonestack removed. Whether or not the model matches any particular Dumble is unknown as we have not been able to procure a non-HRM Dumble yet. The model is based on schematics that were given to us that supposedly accurately represent Robben Ford's Dumble. Whether or not the schematics are accurate I do not know. The voltage divider at the output of V1B is set to 0.078 which is based on the values that are indicated on the schematic for the set-point of the trimmer. As no two Dumbles are identical it stands to reason that one person's interpretation of the ideal Dumble voicing may not agree with another's. Since V1 is running clean you can get more gain by simply increasing Input Trim. It will have basically the same effect as increasing the trimmer."
    6. "A signal divider, which is more correctly called a voltage divider, is calculated by taking the resistance to ground divided by the sum of the resistances. In this case the voltage divider would be 26.7/317 = 0.084. This is very close to the values that we were given (which yield 0.078). Our model also uses local feedback on V1B (which is about 2-3 dB less gain) and accounts for the voltage divider's affect on the AC load line. In fact all stages in a Dumble typically have an AC load-line that's different than the DC load-line due to the load resistance being significant in relation to the plate resistor. Since V1A and V1B run clean (linear) Input Trim will accomplish the same thing as increasing the trimmer into the drive stages. This is because a linear system is commutative (see any introductory Signals and Systems text for properties of linear systems). The commutative property is where A x B = B x A. Therefore it does not matter if the gain is before or after the linear stages."
    7. "The Mid switch, sometimes labeled "Deep", shorts out the 390 pF cap in the tone stack (which is in series with a 2 nF cap). All that is left then is the 2 nF cap. With PAB active this lowers the lowcut frequency." source
    8. "Maybe the best clean model IMO. You have to really crank the MV though (just like the real amp)." source
  • Yek's write-up.

ODS-100 FORD 1

See above.

ODS-100 FORD 2

See above.

ODS-100 FORD MID-BOOST

See above.

ODS-100 HRM

See above.

ODS-100 HRM MID

See above.

PVH 6160 BLOCK (based on Peavey "Block Letter" EVH 5150)

5150.jpg

  • Based on: Peavey "Block Letter" EVH 5150 head, the High Gain input of the Lead channel of an amp named after the criminally insane. Two inputs (Normal Gain and High Gain), 6L6 tubes, 120 watts. "Block Letter" refers to the block letters on the face plate. These were replaced with Eddie Van Halen's signature after Electro-Voice complained about it. It's being said that original "block letter" 5150 models were shipped with better tubes (Sylvania) than the later signature ones. The EVH 5150 was renamed into Peavey 6505.
  • Suggested cabs: 5150 (Sheffield 1200), G12M, G12H. Stock cab(s): 4x12 PVH 6160 MIX, 4x12 PVH 6160 (RW).
  • Original controls: Pre and Post Gain, Low, Mid, High, Resonance (model: Depth), Presence. Not modeled: Bright and Crunch switches on Rhythm channel.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "I have a "holy grail" Block Letter 5150 (supposedly). It sounds way better than most 5150s for some reason which is a good thing for you guys. I think it's partly due to the fact that it has a bias mod so it's biased a bit warmer than a stock version." source
  • Yek's write-up.

PVH 6160+ LEAD (based on Peavey 6505+ / EVH 5150-II)

6505.jpg

  • Based on: Peavey 6505+ head (same amp as the EVH 5150-II), called the new standard for "brutality and aggression". Single input, 6L6, 120 watts. The RHY B model is based on the Rhythm channel with the Crunch and Bright switches depressed. The RHY model is based on Channel 1 with the Crunch switch depressed and Bright out. The LD model is based on the Lead channel.
  • Suggested cabs: V30. 4x12 PVH 6160 MIX.
  • Original controls Rhythm channel: Pre (gain), Bright switch (6dB at 2kHz), Crunch switch, Low, Mid, High, Post (Master), Resonance, Presence.
  • Original controls Lead channel: Pre (gain), Low, Mid, High, Post (Master), Resonance, Presence.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "Chris Quigley's 6505 was the reference amp. It's my amp now. It's a very good sounding one." source
    2. (about channel 1) "Someone was looking for that amp model recently so I dug our 6505+ out and was surprised at how nice that channel sounds." source
  • Yek's write-up.

PVH 6160+ RHYTHM

See above.

PVH 6160+ RHYTHM B

See above.

PLEXI 100W 1970 (based on Marshall Plexi)

SLP.png

  • Based on: Marshall (Super) Lead 1959, the classic "Plexi" amp head that gave rise to “the stack”. Models: '69 100 watts and '72 50 watts heads (EL34), '72 50 watts with 6550 power tubes and jumpered inputs, '70 Marshall 1959SLP 100 (EL34). The Plexi 100W 1970 has a darker, smoother sound than earlier Plexis. Plexi Hi 2 is similar to Plexi 50W Hi 1 except the second triode stage has a 0.68uF cathode bypass capacitor (added in the early 70’s and gives a slightly brighter tone). Plexi 2204 is based on a 1981 50W JMP with master volume.
  • Suggested cabs: Marshall, G12M, G12H, G12L.
  • Original controls: Volume, Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "One of the first mods people make to real 'Plexi' Marshalls is to "clip the bright cap". The bright cap varied over the years, supposedly depending on what was lying around in the shop. The model defaults to the bright cap in the circuit. If you turn off Bright you're effectively clipping the bright cap. The bright cap in Marshalls can be very bright and harsh. However, if you crank the Master you might find the extra brightness helps compensate for the power amp getting darker."
    2. "It's the way a Plexi is supposed to sound. That's due to the cathode follower. That raspiness helps it cut through in a mix. I own three of them and they are that fizzy." source
    3. "Don't be afraid to turn the bass all the way down or the treble all the way up. Just like with the actual amp. For example, on the normal channel of a Plexi most people turn the bass way down. Otherwise it's too flubby."
    4. "My settings for a "typical" Plexi tone are Bass: 2, Mid: 8, Treble 7.5. Adjust Presence to taste." source
    5. (about Quantum 2.0) "Try the Plexi 100W 1970 with Factory Cab 54. Be sure to dial it in like you would in 1970, i.e. turn the Mid, Treble and Presence way up; turn Norm Drive and Bass down a bit." source
    6. About Plexi Normal: "The topology of that model does not support a bright cap and the actual amp has no bright cap." source
    7. (Boston/Rockman sound) "Plexi Jump. Everything on 7. Put a Filter block in front: Type: Peaking, Freq: ~800 Hz, Q: 0.707, Gain 12 dB." source
    8. (favorite classic Plexi) "50w 6550." source
    9. (Plexi 100w 1970) "I've never cared for that model nor the actual amp. IMO it doesn't have enough feedback (100K off the 4-ohm tap). Some amps of that era had 47K off the 4-ohm tap. Some had 47K off the 8-ohm tap. Some had 100K off the 8-ohm tap and some even had 47K off the 16-ohm tap! IOW all over the map. Bottom line: try adjusting Negative Feedback. I always raise it up a bit with that model. Around 4 or so." source
    10. "What you are hearing is output transformer high frequency resonance. Old Plexis didn't do this because they had good transformers. New transformers are crappy and resonate at the cutoff frequency because they are underdamped. This causes a raspy, fizzy texture to the distortion. The transformer resonance is adjustable but the parameter isn't exposed to the user. When you turn it up you get that same squishy rasp that you are hearing. For the Plexis I have the damping set to flat with no resonance because that's how our vintage Plexis measure. Our 50W is a little underdamped but people complain about raspy high frequencies so I erred on the safe side." source
    11. (Plexi 2204) Forum discussion.
  • Yek's write-up.

PLEXI 100W HIGH

See above.

PLEXI 100W JUMP

See above.

PLEXI 100W NRML

See above.

PLEXI 50W 6550

See above.

PLEXI 2204

See above.

PLEXI 50W HIGH 1

See above.

PLEXI 50W HIGH 2

See above.

PLEXI 50W JUMP

See above

PLEXI 50W NORMAL

See above.

PRINCE TONE 5F2 (Fender Tweed Princeton, 5F2)

Princeton.jpg

  • Based on various Fender Princeton amplifiers: tweed (5F2), '66 Blackface with reverb edition (AA964), and a silverface (AA964, early CBS, pre-CBS design and components). 6V6 tubes, low wattage.
  • Suggested cabs: Fender Princeton (C10n). Stock cab(s): Princetone.
  • Original controls: Volume, Bass, Treble (plus Reverb and Tremolo).
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "A Princeton Reverb has an extra gain stage due to the reverb recovery. Hence it has more gain." source
    2. Yek's write-up.

PRINCE TONE AA964 (based on Fender silverface Princeton without reverb, AA964)

See above.

PRINCE TONE REVERB (based on '66 Fender blackface Princeton with reverb, AA964)

Princetonreverb.jpg

See above.

RECTO1 ORANGE MODERN (based on MESA 2-channel Dual Rectifier)

Recto.png

  • Based on: original rev. F two-channel (model: Recto1) and three-channel (model: Recto2) Dual Rectifier, high-gain masterpieces with crushing power and tightness. 6L6 tubes. Models: Orange Modern, Orange Normal, Orange Vintage, Red Modern and Red Vintage.
  • Suggested cabs: MESA V30. Stock cab(s): 4x12 Recto.
  • Original controls: Gain, Master, Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence.
  • The operation of Presence depends on the channel/mode of the amp, and likewise on the model.
  • Firmware revisions:
    1. Firmware 10: The Modern modes are highly sensitive to MV setting. Higher MV settings result in more midrange focus while lower MV settings produce a more scooped tone. It is recommended to experiment with the MV setting to achieve the desired tone while compensating for the level increase/decrease with the Level control.
    2. Firmware 14: Improved Recto models tone stack accuracy. The Recto models now use an exact digital replica of the unique tone control network used in those amps. Furthermore the Presence control now operates like the actual amp in all models (i.e. for those models where there is no negative feedback the Presence control is actually part of the tone stack). NOTE: If the power amp modeling is defeated the Presence control usually operates as a shelving filter with noon being neutral. For the Recto models where the Presence control is part of the tone stack this will not be the case. The Presence control will continue to act as it does when the power amp modeling is active since it is part of the preamp.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "Real Rectos are bassy/fizzy beasts but that tone works great for certain genres." source
    2. "If you are using the Modern modes be very careful with the MV. If you turn it up too high it will flub out really quick. If in doubt reduce the MV. Compensate with the Level control." source
    3. "The Modern mode in Rectos has no negative feedback so there's a huge bass boost from the speaker impedance. Fortunately you can reduce this by reducing the LF Resonance on the Spkr tab which is something you can't do with the real amp without trying different speakers or cabinet." source
    4. "Depth works by varying the negative feedback at low frequencies. There is no NFB in the Modern Red mode so the Depth knob won't do anything. NFB is set to 0.01 just to fool the GUI into displaying Presence instead of HiCut below the left knob." And: "When you put a Recto into Modern Red mode it opens a relay which removes the NFB." source And: "That is intentional. It's a software trick to force the model not to use Hi Cut but Presence instead. That amount of feedback is inaudible." source
    5. "All passive tone controls interact and all the Axe-Fx tone stacks replicate this behavior. The unique thing about a Dual Recto tone stack is that the Presence control is part of the tone stack. So the Recto tone controls also interact with the presence control." source
    6. "If you are using the Modern mode then it's all about the Spkr page. Since that mode has no negative feedback the speaker resonance has a tremendous effect on the sound. Adjust LF Res, Freq and Q to get desired response." source
    7. "Another thing with the Modern modes is that the power amp distorts early (again since there is no negative feedback and, therefore, the power amp has a lot more gain). At 9:00 on the Master the power amp is distorting (it's probably a linear taper pot for the ol' "Wow, this amp is loud bro!"). The taper of the Axe-Fx Master Volume is not the same and you have to turn it up higher to get the same amount of virtual power amp distortion. Another thing is that if you put ANYTHING in the loop of a Recto it changes the tone significantly. Even just a short cable. All the models were made with the loop off. And another thing is that Rectos changed a lot. I have three of them and they all sound completely different. One of them has a different value Gain pot than the others. One of them has a different value bright cap than the one with the same Gain pot. Since the gain pot and bright cap interact this makes a HUGE difference. Experiment with the Bright Cap value. The Recto1 models are based on our Rev. F (IIRC, whatever the desirable ones are). The Recto2 models are based on the latest version." source
    8. "We have three of them, a single and two duals)." source
    9. "If you want that Recto crunch but not so flubby and fizzy try the SOLO models. They're much brighter so I turn the treble down quite a bit." source
  • Yek's write-up.

RECTO1 ORANGE NORMAL

See above.

RECTO1 RED

See above.

RECTO2 ORANGE MODERN (based on MESA 3-channel Dual Rectifier)

See above.

RECTO2 ORANGE VINTAGE

See above.

RECTO2 RED MODERN

See above.

RECTO2 RED VINTAGE

See above.

RUBY ROCKET (based on Paul Ruby Rocket)

Rocket.jpg

  • Based on: Paul Ruby Rocket, a Trainwreck Rocket clone (similar to a Vox). EL84 tubes. The BRT model (more gain) was modeled with the Bright switch in the up position, the other one with the Bright switch in the down position.
  • Suggested cabs: Alnico, G12M.
  • Original controls: Volume, Bass, Treble, Cut.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The Ruby Rocket is not the same as an actual Trainwreck Rocket. There are topology differences and the amps don't sound the same." source
  • Yek's write-up.

RUBY ROCKET BRIGHT

See above.

SV BASS (based on Ampeg SVT)

Ampeg.jpg

  • Based on: Ampeg SVT (Super Vacuum Tube or Super Valve Tube), a bass head used for decades by famous bassists the world over. Six 6550 tubes, 300 watts, two inputs (for passive and active basses).
  • Suggested cabs: SVT 8x10. Stock cab(s): 1x15 SV, 4x10 SV, 8x10 SV. More IRs of an 8x10 SVT bass cabinet can be bought from Dr Bonkers.
  • Original controls: Volume, Bass, Mid (and Mid Frequency), Treble, Master, Ultra Lo / Hi switches.
  • Yek's write-up.

SHIVER CLEAN (based on Bogner Shiva 20th Anniversary)

Shiva.png

  • Based on: Bogner Shiva Clean, 20th Anniversary model with KT88 tubes. A sweet, rich-sounding amp with powerful shimmering cleans and aggressive, English-style midrange punch.
  • Suggested cabs: Classic 80, V30. Stock cab(s): 1x12 Shiver.
  • Original controls Clean channel: Volume, Bass, Treble, Bright switch (less to none effective the higher Drive is set). Original controls Lead channel: Gain, Bass, Middle, Treble, Bright switch (less effective the higher Drive is set but still noticeable). Sharde controls: Master, Presence. "Boost" and "Shift" controls have not been modeled (use Input Trim as Boost).
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "People think Bogners are dark but they really aren't. The reason they seem that way is the pot tapers. Most people assume knobs should be set somewhere around noon. If you do this on a Bogner it's like turning the treble way down on a Marshall. Close your eyes and adjust the tone controls with your ears. Don't be afraid to turn them way up or way down." source
    2. "Human nature is to put the knobs near noon. We are reticent to deviate much from noon. Amp designers exploit this and use different tapers to change the sound of their amps WITH THE KNOBS AT NOON. A prime example are Bogner amps. Everyone says "Bogner amps are dark". No they aren't. But he uses a Log10A taper for the treble pot. It's a standard Marshall tone stack. Usually a linear taper pot is used for the treble. The treble knob at 5.0 (noon) on a Bogner is equivalent to the treble knob at 1.0 on a Marshall. People put the knob at 5.0 and go "wow, this amp is dark". No it isn't. If you turned the treble up to 8 or 9 it would sound a lot like a Plexi but humans are reticent to turn the knobs to extremes. Amp designers know this and exploit it to give their amps a "signature sound"." source
    3. "The original Shiva models were based on a borrowed amp. We now have a 20th Anniversary Shiva (with KT88s) and the new models are based on that amp. We did notice that this amp has less gain than the one used originally but the model is faithful to the amp." source
  • Yek's write-up.

SHIVER LEAD

See above.

SOLO 100 CLEAN (based on Soldano SLO-100)

Slo.jpg

  • Based on: Soldano SLO-100 (Super Lead Overdrive), noted for its hot-rod chrome chassis and aggressive rhythm tone. Normal (Clean / Crunch) and snarling Lead channel, 100 watts, 6L6 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: Soldano (12" Eminence). Stock Cab(s): 4x12 Solo.
  • Original controls: Gain, Bass, Middle, Treble, Master, Presence, Bright switch (Normal channel).
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The SLO-100 is the loudest amp I've ever used. It feels like there's a small nuclear explosion going off inside when ever you hit a power chord. It's a wicked amp but not something I would recommend for anything but large gigs. If you like the SLO-100 model you might want to try the Recto models too. It's not widely known but the Rectifier preamp is a derivative of the SLO-100. Some minor changes but the basic topology is identical."
    2. "I have a really good SLO-100. An original black faceplate version. Pristine condition. That amp was one of the primary amps used in the G2 modeling development. It was by studying that and a really nice JCM-800 that I finally figured out the secret to cathode follower." source
    3. (talking about the Depth control, firmware 10): "Mine doesn't have the depth mod but I used the values from the schematic I have and I believe the schematic is correct." source
    4. "SLOs are brittle at low volumes. When you crank them up it smooths out. The problems is at cranked volumes they can kill small animals." source
    5. "The key to an SLO100 is to run the MV high so that the mids thicken up. Otherwise it's a shrill mess. In certain contexts with the right IR it can be a cool sound." source
    6. "Note that the knobs on '5' on the Axe-Fx correspond to '6' on an SLO because they go to 11. 'Noon' on an SLO isn't actually the knobs at half-way. The range of the knobs is like 8:00 to 6:00 as opposed to 7:00 to 5:00. They're biased clockwise." source
    7. "Another caveat when comparing amps: many times the knobs aren't "centered". IOW if you put the Treble knob at noon it isn't actually at 50%. You can see this by turning the knob all the way down and all the way up. It may not be symmetrical. This happens when the pots don't have a flat spot and/or the pot is rotated within the mounting hole. Or in the case of an SLO100 it is intentional. On an SLO100 all the way down is around 8:00 and all the way up is 6:00 so 50% is around 1:00 not noon." source
    8. "Many people find SLOs too bright. The "Warren Haynes" mod is a popular mod to reduce the brightness." source
    9. "Those amps are all designed to get their character from power amp distortion. If you don't push the power amp all you are hearing is the preamp which is voiced to be trebly. The power amp then compresses the highs and the sound gets fatter." source
    10. "If you want that Recto crunch but not so flubby and fizzy try the SOLO models. They're much brighter so I turn the treble down quite a bit." source
  • Yek's write-up.

SOLO 100 LEAD

See above.

SOLO 100 RHY

See above.

SOLO 88 CLEAN (based on Soldano X88R)

X88r.jpg

  • Based on: the clean, rhythm and lead channels of a Soldano X88R preamp, 6L6 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: n/a.
  • Original controls: Gain, Bass, Middle, Treble, Volume.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "Solo 88 RHY is based on an X88R since the rhythm channel of an X99 is identical to an SLO-100. FWIW, I have two X88Rs and the model agrees with both." source
  • Yek's write-up.

SOLO 88 LEAD

See above.

SOLO 88 RHYTHM

See above.

SOLO 99 CLEAN (based on Soldano/Caswell X99)

Cliff X88.jpg

  • Based on: the clean and lead channels of a Soldano/Caswell midi-motorized Soldano X99 preamp. 6L6 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: n/a.
  • Original controls: Gain, Bass, Middle, Treble, Volume.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The rhythm channel of an X99 is identical to a SLO 100." source
    2. "Power amp: same as SLO100." source
  • Yek's write-up.

SOLO 99 LEAD

See above.

SPAWN NITROUS 1 (based on Splawn Nitro)

Nitro.gif

  • Based on: Splawn Nitro. 100 watts, KT88 tubes. Splawn: "All the Splawn tone with more saturation and voiced for a bigger low end and low mids". Modeled: Overdrive channel, OD-1 (rhythm) and OD-2 (lead) modes.
  • Suggested cabs: G12M, G12-65, V30.
  • Original controls: Resonance, Presence, Bass, Middle, Treble, Master, Gain.
  • Yek's write-up.

SPAWN NITROUS 2

See above.

SPAWN ROD OD1-1 (based on Splawn Quickrod)

Quickrod.jpg

  • Based on: Splawn Quick Rod, an amp with bold body and a bit of bite. 100 watts, EL34 tubes. Clean channel, and overdrive channel with 3 modes (1st gear = Plexi, 2nd gear = Hot Rod JCM 800, 3rd gear = Super Hot Rod 800). The OD-2 have an additional gain boost.
  • Suggested cabs: G12M, G12-65, V30.
  • Original controls: Presence, Bass, Middle, Treble, Solo, Volume, Gain, Mode.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The reason Splawns sound weird is because the tone stack is plate driven. You lose the cathode follower compression and the high source resistance of the plate alters the tone stack frequency response. The plate driven tone stack in the Splawn reduces the highs considerably. You can see this is you run Tone Stack Calculator for the Marshall tone stack and increase the source resistance." source
    2. "OD2 switches in a cathode bypass cap which increases the gain of that stage." source
    3. "The Quick Rod is a bit odd in that the Drive pot is linear taper. Most amps use an audio taper pot. This means that at noon the amp is nearly at full gain. Not sure why they did it that way but it is what it is." source
  • Yek's write-up.

SPAWN ROD OD1-2

See above.

SPAWN ROD OD1-3

See above.

SPAWN ROD OD2-1

See above.

SPAWN ROD OD2-2

See above.

SPAWN ROD OD2-3

See above.

SUHR BADGER 18 (based on Suhr Badger 18)

Badger18.jpg

  • Based on: Suhr Badger, 18 and 30 watts models, single channel. The 18w model has a EL-84 powered tube rectifier. The 30w model has a solid state rectifier and EL34 tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: V30, G12M.
  • Original controls: Bass, Middle, Treble, Gain, Power (controls Power Scaling), Drive (acts as Master with Power at 10).
  • Firmware 17.03: "Note that these amps do not have Hi-Cut controls and the Hi-Cut control in the model is therefore non-functional."
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The Badgers were MIMIC'd with power scaling at full. The knobs are a bit confusing on a Badger. The knob closest to the input jack is labeled "Gain". It is equivalent to the Drive knob in the Axe. The knob labeled Drive is the Master Volume." source
  • Yek's write-up.

SUHR BADGER 30 (based on Suhr Badger 30)

Badger30.jpg

See above.

SUPER VERB NORMAL (based on Fender Super Reverb, AB763)

Superreverb.jpg

  • Based on: pre-CBS 1964 blackface Fender Super Reverb, AB763 circuit, 6L6, 40 watts, low and high inputs, Normal and Vibrato channels.
  • Suggested cabs: 4x10 Jensen C10R, C10Q, P10R. Stock cabs(s): 2x2 Super, 4x10 Super.
  • Original controls: Volume, Bass, Middle, Treble, Bright switch, reverb and vibrato controls.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "I modeled the Super with V1 pulled as most people pull V1 so the amp has more grunt. Turn down the MV to make it cleaner"
    2. "The Super Reverb model is "Diaz Modded". IOW, I pulled V1. This gives the amp a lot more gain so it's not surprising you're getting breakup at around 1.5. You can un-mod the model by turning down the MV Trim to around 0.5." source
    3. "A Pro Reverb is basically identical to a Super Reverb except for the speakers (and faceplate)." source And: "The Blackface Pro Reverb, model AA165, was virtually identical to the AB763 Super Reverb except for the speakers and tone stacks. If you use the Super Verb model and set the Tone Stack type to Blackface you'll basically have a Pro Reverb. Set the Mid control fairly high to emulate the fixed 6.8K mid resistor. I'd say around 7 or 8." source
    4. (about blackface versions) "Not a huge change with the Silverfaced versions. They're a little cleaner and brighter but the topology is the same. Some minor circuit changes here and there. Same transformers. The biggest change, IMO, was changing the PI resistors to 47K which gives you a little less gain in the PI." source
  • Yek's write-up.

SUPER VERB VIBRATO

See above.

SUPERTWEED (custom model)

Logo small.png

SUPREMO TREM (based on Supro 1964T)

Supro.png

  • Based on: Supro 1964T Dual-Tone, a cool classic, originally intended for bass. 6973 power tubes, two channels.
  • Suggested cabs: Supro 12". Stock cab(s): 2x12 Supremo Mix.
  • Original controls: Volume, Tone (model: Treble).
  • Yek's write-up.

TEXAS STAR CLEAN (based on MESA Lone Star Classic)

Lonestar.png

  • Based on the clean and drive tones of an original MESA Lone Star Classic with 6L6 power tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: MESA C90. Stock cab(s): 2x12 TX Star, 1x12 Shadow Mix.
  • Original controls: Drive, Gain, Treble, Mid, Bass, Presence, Master, Voicing.
  • Yek's write-up.

TEXAS STAR LEAD

See above.

THORDENDAL MODERN (old Recto models)

Meshuggah.jpg

  • Based on: pre-G3 models of MESA's Dual Rectifier, requested by Fredrik Thordendal from Meshuggah.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "What happened was this: the old Recto models weren't terribly accurate. When G3 came out the models were accurate but Fredrik contacted me and said something like "ahhhhh, I loved the old Recto model". So I took the old Recto models and made them "Thordendal" models." source
  • Yek's write-up.

THORDENDAL VINTAGE

See above.

TREMOLO LUX (based on blackface Fender Tremolux, AA763)

Tremolux.jpg

  • Based on a Fender Tremolux with AA763 circuit. 6L6 power tubes, high and low inputs, Normal and Vibrato channels.
  • Suggested cabs: Fender 2x10".
  • Original controls (Vibrato channel): Volume, Bright switch, Treble, Bass, Tremolo controls.
  • Yek's write-up.

TUBE PRE

Logo small.png

  • Based on: a completely neutral, low-gain tube preamp, useful for “warming up” various sources (including acoustic guitar and vocals) or to act as a power amplifier.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The Tube Pre model is neutral. The "Vintage" tone stack is flat. The Tube Pre model uses the Vintage tone stack. The Vintage tone stack is a passive EQ model but it has a flat response when the controls are at noon. If you want "active" EQ you need to set the type to Active." source
    2. "If you only need power amp modeling, for example when using an external pre-amp through the Axe-Fx, use the Tube Pre model. It uses the Vintage tonestack which is flat when the tone controls are at noon." source
  • Yek's write-up.

TWO STONE J35 1 (based on Two-Rock Jet 35)

Jet35.jpg

  • Based on: Two-Rock Jet 35, 35 watts tube amp with 6L6 power tubes. Model 1: Lead mode, Preamp Bypass engaged (Bypass switch bypasses the input tone stack to give a more focused lead sound). Model 2: Lead mode, Preamp Bypass off.
  • Suggested cabs: G12-65.
  • Original controls: Treble, Mid, Bass, Gain (model: Input Gain), Master, Lead Gain (model: Overdrive), pull bright.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "Yes, it's very smooth but there's this unique chirp or something that I've never heard in an amp before. When you hit the note there's this blast of high end that rapidly decays so it has an almost vocal quality. The frequency shaping is very different than most other amps."
    2. "The Two Rock is the most unique amp I've ever modeled. Almost like a violin but with this really cool chirp on the pick attack." source
  • Yek's write-up.

TWO STONE J35 2

See above.

USA BASS 400 1 (based on MESA/Boogie Bass 400)

Mesabass400.jpg

  • Based on: MESA Bass 400 tube amplifier. Model "1" has Bass Shift disabled, model "2" has Bass Shift engaged.
  • Suggested cabs: bass cabs.
  • Original controls: Bass, Middle, Treble, Pull Bright, Bass/Mid/Treble Shift, 7-band GEQ.
  • Yek's write-up.

USA BASS 400 2

See above.

USA CLEAN (based on MESA/Boogie Mark IV)

Markiv.jpg

  • Based on: MESA/Boogie Mark IV. 85 watts, 6L6 power tubes, single input, Class-A or Simul-Class. Channels: Rhythm 1 (model: USA Clean), Rhythm 2 (model: USA Rhythm) and Lead (model: USA Lead). The Lead BRT models have Pull Bright engaged. The Lead+ models have Voicing set to Mid Gain, the other Lead models have Voicing set to Harmonics.
  • Suggested cabs: MESA C90 or V30. Stock cab(s): USA.
  • Original controls: Gain, Lead Drive, Treble, Bass, Mid, Presence, Master. Pull Bright on Rhythm 1 and Lead channel. Pull Fat on Rhythm 2 and Lead channel. Presence Shift on Rhythm 2 and Lead channels, graphic EQ, Pentode/Triode switch, Class-A/Simul-Class switch, Voicing switch (Mid Gain / Harmonics), Variac.
  • Firmware notes:
    1. Firmware 10: "(...) the Presence control (as in the actual amp) is neutral when set to 5.00 (noon). Turning the knob CCW decreases the amount of presence and vice-versa. By comparison, most amps are only able to increase presence and the control is neutral when set to zero."
    2. Firmware 17: "Due to the unique topology of the feedback network in these amps the Depth control is non-functional. "A “Presence Shift” switch has been added to certain “USA” amp models (those based on amps with a “Pull Shift” on the Presence knob). This switch is found under the Presence control and replicates the behavior when the Presence knob is pulled out on these amps. Note that the behavior of this switch is authentic and may result in volume reduction when active since the negative feedback is increased which lowers the loop gain."
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The MK V is basically a compendium of previous Mesa amps. There may be minor differences in tone due to circuit layout but nothing a few tweaks to the EQ can't fix." source
    2. "Having owned multiple Mark IV's, multiple Triaxis's and a variety of other Boogie products, I can tell that the Mark series in general are a bitch to dial in. Once you figure them out though they are great amps. IMO, the key to a MKIV is to use the TMB to get the feel and the EQ to get the tone."
    3. On Lead models with Mid Gain switched off, Lead Voicing on the real amp was set to "Harmonics". source
    4. "The Depth knob is inactive on that amp model. The real amp doesn't have one either." source
    5. "Fat and Presence shift work as the real amp." source
    6. "USA Clean is based on the MKIV." source
    7. "With the presence control at noon it's roughly neutral. Turn it down and you are actually boosting bass and reducing treble." source
    8. "I have a Mark IIC+, a Mark IV, a Mark V and a Triaxis. They're all completely different. Mesa always says things like "sounds the same as a IIC+" but the circuits are different and, probably most important, the knob tapers are completely different." source
    9. "The key to a good Boogie sound, IMO, is the Fat Switch. This is the treble Pull Shift on the IIC+ and the Pull Fat on the Mark IV. Mesa knew this and the Lead 2 modes on the Triaxis all had the treble shift engaged by default." source
    10. "There isn't any way to run the virtual power tubes in triode mode... but you can change the Power Tube Type to "300B" which is a triode. When you run a pentode (or beam tetrode) in triode mode you connect the screen to the anode which effectively defeats the screen. This lowers the output impedance of the plate significantly which, in turn, lowers the output impedance of the amp itself making the voltage output less dependent on the speaker impedance. Using the 300B tube type should get you pretty close." source
  • Yek's write-up.

USA IIC+ (based on MESA/Boogie Mark IIC+)

Iic+.jpg

  • Based on: Mesa/Boogie Mark IIC+ Simul-Class with reverb, without graphic EQ. An US-made amp famous for its smooth "liquid" overdrive sound. 6L6 tubes, single input, Class-A or Simul-Class (modeled). Four models with Lead Master Pull Bright on/off and Pull Deep on/off.
  • Suggested cabs: EVM. Stock Cab(s): 4x12 Rumble.
  • Original controls: Volume (pull: Bright), Treble (pull: Shift = Fat), Bass (pull: Shift, not modeled), Middle, Presence, Master rhythm (pull: Deep), Lead Drive and Master Lead (pull: Bright).
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The mode in the Mark V is based on the later SimulClass version" source.
    2. "If you want the sound of the non-SimulClass version set Triode 1 Plate Freq to 1350 Hz." source
    3. "The Pull Bright on the Volume knob is the classic "Bright Cap" which engages a capacitor across the potentiometer. This is already modeled in the Axe-Fx via the Bright Switch. The Pull Bright on the Lead Master knob engages a 0.22uF cap on the cathode of the last triode in the overdrive circuit. As there is no switch for this in the Axe-Fx it requires a separate model. Cathode caps are very common in tube amps. If the value is large the stage has more gain and the response is relatively flat. If the value is small the stage has more gain at higher frequencies. Amp designers use cathode caps to shape the frequency response. Caps in the range of 0.1 to 1.0 uF are commonly used to reduce bass response. A cathode cap works by decreasing the amount of negative feedback through shunting higher frequencies to ground. This reduced negative feedback increases the gain (and reduces linearity). FWIW the Axe-Fx is the only modeler of which I'm aware that actually models triodes using a feedback technique. Other modelers use static waveshapers. The Axe-Fx triode models incorporate feedback so if there is a virtual cathode cap the stage is less linear in addition to having more gain." source
    4. "The IIC+ does not have a gain boost and doesn't need one. There is plenty of gain. The Pull Deep switch engages a large cathode cap on the final triode stage. With Pull Deep off there is actually a shelving response into the power amp (bass is reduced)."
    5. (to emulate Pull Shift on the Bass) "Put a Tilt EQ before the amp block with a frequency of 320 Hz and a gain of -3 dB. Set the Level to +3 dB". source
    6. "I have a Mark IIC+, a Mark IV, a Mark V and a Triaxis. They're all completely different. Mesa always says things like "sounds the same as a IIC+" but the circuits are different and, probably most important, the knob tapers are completely different." source
    7. "The key to a good Boogie sound, IMO, is the Fat Switch. This is the treble Pull Shift on the IIC+ and the Pull Fat on the Mark IV. Mesa knew this and the Lead 2 modes on the Triaxis all had the treble shift engaged by default." source
    8. "I always used the Fat switch with the real amp." (IIC+) source
    9. Tips from Cliff: (source)
      1. "I begrudgingly dragged the amp out of storage today (as it weighs a metric ton) and repeated the measurements and did some A/B tests. As expected the models are extremely accurate. That being said it is a bear to dial in. Here are some tips:
      2. The old version of the model incorrectly referenced the Mark IV tone stack. These tone stacks are identical except for the taper of the mid pot. The IIC+ has a linear pot and the Mark IV has a Log10 pot. I had it backwards in my earlier comments. My guess is that Mesa found that turning the midrange down sounds best (and it does) so they changed the pot taper to do this automatically since noon on a Log10 pot is equal to a 1.0 on a linear pot.
      3. Commensurate with (1) I found myself turning the midrange down as well as the bass and turning the treble up.
      4. I think the default Master Volume value is a bit high so you may want to turn that down. I've reduced the default for Quantum 2.03.
      5. Turn the bright switch on. Every bit of information I've found says that people typically used the Pull Bright on the Volume knob. This is equivalent to the Bright switch under the Treble control on the model. I always turn it on and I've set it on by default for Q2.03.
      6. USE THE EQ. The tone stack is pre-distortion which is atypical for a high-gain amp. Tone stacks are almost always post-distortion. Since the tone stack is pre-distortion you need to do your post distortion tone shaping using the EQ. The tone controls set the feel and the distortion texture, the EQ shapes the final tone. I like to do a gentle V-curve.
      7. These were my settings for a killer high-gain tone: Model: USA IIC+ / Input Drive: 8.1 / Overdrive: 9-10 / Bass: 1.0 / Midrange: 1.8 / Treble: 8.9 / Presence: 4.5 / MV: 4.0 / Level: -20 dB / Bright Switch ON / 80 Hz: 4.8 / 240 Hz: 2.6 / 750 Hz: -4.5 / 2200: -0.2 / 6600: 0."
  • Yek's write-up.

USA IIC+ BRIGHT

See above.

USA IIC+ BRIGHT/DEEP

See above.

USA IIC+ DEEP

See above.

USA IIC++ (based on MESA/Boogie Mark IIC+)

Metallica.jpg

  • Based on: Mesa/Boogie Mark IIC+. This model is used by Metallica for their live sound. source
  • Notes: see USA IIC+.

USA LEAD (based on MESA/Boogie Mark IV)

See USA CLEAN model above.

USA LEAD +

See USA CLEAN model above.

USA LEAD BRIGHT

See USA CLEAN model above.

USA LEAD BRT +

See USA CLEAN model above.

USA PRE CLEAN (based on MESA/Boogie TriAxis)

Triaxis.png

  • Based on: MESA/Boogie TriAxis 19" tube preamp, MIDI-programmable with digital controls and an analog path. Modes:
    1. Rhythm Green: “Vintage Fat Rhythm" or "old Black Face".
    2. Lead 1 Red (TX-4 board): "classic British lead".
    3. Lead 2 Green: "Mid Gain Mark IV Lead".
    4. Lead 2 Yellow: "IIC+ Lead".
    5. Lead 2 Red: "shred".
  • Suggested cabs: n/a.
  • Original controls: Drive (model: Input Drive), Lead Drive (model: Overdrive), Treble, Middle, Bass, Presence, Master. Dynamic Voice (EQ) not modeled.
  • Keep Presence at default and use the Bright knob to dial in the high frequencies.
  • Firmware release notes:
    1. 10: "Based on Mesa Triaxis LD2 modes. Note that these were modeled with the Triaxis Presence control at maximum as this control is actually a hi-cut control. Also note that the mid control in the model has far more range than the preamp. At a value of 5.0 the responses will match but the amount of mid cut on the Axe-Fx is greater."
    2. 13.07: added the “Bright” control to the Amp block. This high treble control is a shelving filter between the preamp and power amp and may be used to darken or brighten the output of the preamp. This control also accurately replicates the “Presence” control found in the Mesa Triaxis preamp when set to negative values (the Presence control in the Triaxis is actually a high frequency cut shelving filter).
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "I used a Triaxis for, shoot, I dunno, over a decade before designing the Axe-Fx. I have two of them. So I'd say I'm pretty familiar with the tones. To my ears (and my measurement equipment), the Axe-Fx models are spot-on."
    2. "I can nail the sound of my Triaxis now by setting it (Bright) around 9:00 - 10:00." source. And: "10 on the Triaxis would be 0 dB on the Bright parameter. Anything below 10 is equivalent to less than noon on the Bright parameter. The "Presence" control on a Triaxis is always a hi cut, it never boosts. The Bright parameter is not an exact match to the Triaxis Presence control though. It is a fixed shelving filter. The Triaxis Presence control is passive so the center frequency changes with the amount of cut. It also changes the load on the plate which distorts the frequency response a bit too. The Presence parameter should be set to 5.00, which is neutral (see the manual for details)."
    3. "I have a Mark IIC+, a Mark IV, a Mark V and a Triaxis. They're all completely different. Mesa always says things like "sounds the same as a IIC+" but the circuits are different and, probably most important, the knob tapers are completely different." source
    4. "The key to a good Boogie sound, IMO, is the Fat Switch. This is the treble Pull Shift on the IIC+ and the Pull Fat on the Mark IV. Mesa knew this and the Lead 2 modes on the Triaxis all had the treble shift engaged by default." source
    5. "Mesa claims it's based on the IIC+ but it's different. The bright cap is different, the mid resistor is much greater, the source impedance of the drive "pot" is different, etc., etc, etc." source
    6. (firmware Quantum 7) "The USA Pre models now all use a MarkIV power amp model. The 2:90 power amp is basically the same as a MarkIV and does have a presence shift but it's accessed through a jack on the back (Voicing)." source
  • Yek's write-up.

USA PRE LD1 RED

See USA PRE CLEAN.

USA PRE LD2 GREEN

See USA PRE CLEAN.

USA PRE LD2 RED

See USA PRE CLEAN.

USA PRE LD2 YELLOW

See USA PRE CLEAN.

USA RHYTHM (based on Mesa Mark IV)

See USA CLEAN model above.

USA SUB BLUES (based on MESA/Boogie Subway Blues)

Subwayblues.png

  • Based on: MESA/Boogie Subway Blues, 20 watts, EL84 power tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: Eminence 10" Black Shadow.
  • Original controls: Volume, Bass, Mid, Treble, Reverb. Bright and FAT voicings are available through separate inputs or through a switch.
  • Yek's write-up.

VIBRA-KING (based on custom Fender Vibro-King)

Vibro-king.jpg

  • Based on: Fender Vibro-King, famous for crystal cleans and powerful overdrive. Two models: Fat switch engaged/disengaged. 60 watts, 6L6 tubes, two inputs.
  • Original controls: Volume, Treble, Bass, Middle, Fat switch, no Bright switch, tremolo and reverb controls.
  • Suggested cabs: Fender 3x10". Stock cab(s): 3x10 Vibrato Mix.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The model is based on the custom version which has higher plate voltages which causes more overdrive on the power tubes."
  • Yek's write-up.

VIBRA-KING FAT

See above.

VIBRATO LUX (based on Fender Vibrolux)

Vibrolux.jpg

  • Based on: 1963 "brownface" Fender Vibrolux. 6L6 power tubes, two inputs, 35 watts, Normal and Bright channels (modeled: Bright channel).
  • Suggested cabs: 2x10 or 1x12. Stock cab(s): 2x10 Vibrato Lux, 1x12 Vibrato Lux, 1x12 Brown.
  • Original controls (Vibrato channel): Volume, Bass, Treble, and vibrato controls.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "Early Dire Straits tone is a Vibrolux (Vibrato Lux model). The Vibrato Lux model is based on the same model and year amp used on the eponymous album. There's a cab in there too." source
    2. "It's a brown face." source
  • Yek's write-up.

VIBRATO VERB (based on Fender Vibroverb)

Vibroverb.jpg

  • Based on: 40 watts Fender Vibroverb, great for clear or grinding cleans and gutsy blues. 6L6 tubes, low and high inputs, Normal and Bright channels (models: Bright channel).
  • There are 4 models:
    • Vibrato Verb: ported from the Axe-Fx Ultra.
    • AA model: based on Cliff's '64 blackface with AA763 circuit.
    • AB model: based on the AB763 circuit.
    • CS model: based on a Custom Reissue (2003-2008) with the Mod switch (more gain) on.
  • Suggested cabs: 1x15" (Jensen C15N, JBL D130, Eminence). Stock cab(s): try the 1x15 Tweed Pro.
  • Original controls: Volume, Bass, Treble, Bright switch. Plus reverb and tremolo controls.
  • Cliff's comments:
    • The Transformer Matching value for the CS model is based on the output transformer in the actual amp. Legend has it that SRV used a Bassman transformer which would lead to significant overmatching. To replicate this increase Xfrmr Match to around 1.8.
  • Yek's write-up.

VIBRATO VERB AA

See above.

VIBRATO VERB AB

See above.

VIBRATO VERB CUSTOM

See above.

WRECKER EXPRESS (based on Trainwreck Express)

Trainwreck.jpg

  • Based on: Trainwreck Express, designed and built by the late, great Ken Fischer. EL34 power tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: G12M.
  • Original controls: Volume, Bas, Mid, Treble, Presence, Bright switch.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The secret to a Trainwreck is the output transformer. The impedance ratio is about twice that of other amps. I.e. typical 50W Marshall has a primary impedance of about 3200 ohms. A Trainwreck is about 6500 ohms. The causes the power tubes to clip much sooner." source
    2. "Real Trainwrecks are very spitty amps. This is because the last stage heavily overdrives the phase inverter. 7.02 is faithful to the actual amps whereas previous firmwares were more idealized. As was indicated in the release notes you can dial out this behavior by decreasing the PI Bias Shift. If you set it to zero it will be like 6.xx." source
  • Yek's write-up.

WRECKER LIVERPOOL (based on Trainwreck Liverpool)

Trainwreck.jpg

  • Based on: Trainwreck Liverpool. Basically a Trainwreck Express preamp with a Trainwreck Rocket power amp. EL84 power tubes.
  • Suggested cabs: G12M.
  • Original controls: Volume, Bas, Mid, Treble, Presence, Bright switch.
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The secret to a Trainwreck is the output transformer. The impedance ratio is about twice that of other amps. I.e. typical 50W Marshall has a primary impedance of about 3200 ohms. A Trainwreck is about 6500 ohms. The causes the power tubes to clip much sooner." source
    2. "Just because a power amp is "Class A" doesn't mean it can't have negative feedback. True that the majority do not but this particular amp has quite a bit of NF." source
    3. "Uses a Vox-style phase inverter." source
    4. "Real Trainwrecks are very spitty amps. This is because the last stage heavily overdrives the phase inverter. 7.02 is faithful to the actual amps whereas previous firmwares were more idealized. As was indicated in the release notes you can dial out this behavior by decreasing the PI Bias Shift. If you set it to zero it will be like 6.xx." source
  • Yek's write-up.

WRECKER ROCKET (based on Trainwreck Rocket)

Trainwreck.jpg

  • Based on: Trainwreck Circuits Rocket, designed and built by the late, great Ken Fischer. The Rocket with its EL84 is similar to a Vox AC-30. It's the most rare and sought-after Trainwreck amp.
  • Suggested cabs: AlNiCo, G12M.
  • Original controls: Volume, Treble, Bass, Cut (a passive tone control in the output stage of the amplifier, to adjust the contour of treble frequencies).
  • Cliff's comments:
    1. "The secret to a Trainwreck is the output transformer. The impedance ratio is about twice that of other amps. I.e. typical 50W Marshall has a primary impedance of about 3200 ohms. A Trainwreck is about 6500 ohms. The causes the power tubes to clip much sooner." source
    2. "Real Trainwrecks are very spitty amps. This is because the last stage heavily overdrives the phase inverter. 7.02 is faithful to the actual amps whereas previous firmwares were more idealized. As was indicated in the release notes you can dial out this behavior by decreasing the PI Bias Shift. If you set it to zero it will be like 6.xx." source
  • Yek's write-up.